This Day in History: 12/04/1991- Hostage Terry Anderson Freed

This Day in History: 12/04/1991- Hostage Terry Anderson Freed


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In this "This Day in History" video, learn about the history of December 4. It was the day George Washington gave his farewell speech in 1783, Led Zeppelin split up in 1980, and the day in 1992 President Bush sent 28,000 troops to Somalia. It was also the day hostage Terry Anderson was released after being held by Islamic militants for six years.


This Day in History: 12/04/1991- Hostage Terry Anderson Freed - HISTORY

Today is the 338th day of 2019. There are 27 days left in the year.

TODAY'S HIGHLIGHT

2012: A protest by at least 100,000 Egyptians outside the presidential palace in Cairo turns violent as tensions grow over Islamist President Mohammed Morsi's seizure of nearly unrestricted powers and a draft constitution hurriedly adopted by his allies.

OTHER EVENTS

1586: England's Queen Elizabeth I confirms death sentence against Mary Queen of Scots.

1619: The first Thanksgiving celebration takes place in America at the Berkley plantation in Virginia.

1691: Hapsburgs re-conquer Transylvania and are recognised as its rulers.

1842: Spanish soldier-politician Baldomero Espartero bombards Barcelona and crushes revolt.

1851: Louis Napoleon crushes workers' rebellion in France.

1877: Thomas Edison invents the phonograph in his New Jersey laboratory at Menlo Park.

1893: British and French reach an agreement on Siam — now Thailand.

1908: London naval conference fails to regulate conditions of warfare.

1962: Hundreds of Muslim and European opponents of the Ben Bella Government in Algeria are arrested.

1971: Indian troops, tanks and planes launch attacks in East Pakistan — now Bangladesh, and hit key airfields in West Pakistan, which is now Pakistan.

1972: Government of Honduras is overthrown in military coup.

1977: Iraq walks out on Arab meeting in Tripoli, breaking united front against Egypt's peace moves with Israel.

1980: The bodies of four American nuns slain in El Salvador two days earlier are found. Five national guardsmen are later convicted of the murders.

1984: A gunman with a Jordanian passport kills a Jordanian diplomat in Bucharest, Romania, as he leaves a hotel.

1989: Following his shipboard summit with Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, US President George H W Bush says it is too soon to declare the Cold War over.

1990: Iraq says it will release 3,000 Soviets still held hostage in that country but wants compensation.

1991: AP Middle East Correspondent Terry Anderson is freed by Shiite Muslim captors in Lebanon after nearly seven years as a hostage.

1992: US President George H W Bush orders more than 28,000 American troops to lead a mercy mission to Somalia, threatening military action against warlords and gangs who block food for starving millions.

1993: Farmers from Europe, India and Japan demonstrate in Geneva against “American imperialism” and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade accord, fearing it will ruin millions of farmers and uproot centuries-old traditions.

1995: The first North Atlantic Treaty Organization troops land in the Balkans to begin setting up a peace mission. A Cameroon Airlines jet crashes while trying to land in Yaounde, killing at least 60 people.

1996: NASA launches a spacecraft to Mars carrying the first-ever interplanetary rover, a six-wheeled cart that will roam the frigid Martian surface in search of rocks.

1997: Russian authorities say they will charge as a spy an American engineer who made land surveys in Russia.

1998: A Chinese entrepreneur is tried in Shanghai on charges of providing email addresses to an online democracy magazine.

1999: Following a week dominated by protests by opponents of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the push for new global trade talks collapses at the WTO session in Seattle.

2001: The ex-wife of former South African President F W de Klerk, Marike de Klerk, is found murdered in her home near Cape Town.

2002: Indonesian police arrest a Muslim cleric, Ali Ghufron, also known as Mukhlas, whom they suspected of masterminding a bombing on the island of Bali that killed nearly 200 people in October.

2005: Incumbent Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbayev, who has ruled oil-rich Kazakhstan since Soviet times, easily wins a new seven-year term in presidential elections.

2006: The Guayana Shield region, a swath of Amazon rainforest, is placed under government protection in a region infamous for violent conflicts among loggers, ranchers and environmentalists.

2007: Syrian archaeologists announce they have unearthed two Bronze-era cemeteries dating from the 18th century BC, the third set of ancient graveyards found in less than a month.

2008: Zimbabwe declares a national emergency over a cholera epidemic and the collapse of its health care system.

2009: An explosion apparently caused by pyrotechnics tears through a nightclub in the Russian city of Perm, killing more than 100 people.

2010: Spain places striking air traffic controllers under military authority and threatens them with jail terms in an unprecedented emergency order to get planes back in the skies and clear chaotic airports clogged with irate travellers.

2011: IItalian Premier Mario Monti says his government of technocrats has approved a package of austerity and growth measures worth 30 billion euro to “reawaken” the Italian economy and help save the euro common currency from collapse.

2013: A member of the inner circle of Hezbollah, Hassan al-Laqis, is assassinated in Beirut in the latest of a series of attacks against the Iranian-backed Shiite group whose open support of Syrian President Bashar Assad has enraged Sunnis.

2014: Police wage hours-long gun battles with Islamic militants who attacked Chechnya's capital, leaving at least 20 dead and underscoring Russia's vulnerability.

TODAY'S BIRTHDAYS

Rapper Shawn Corey Carter, known professionally as Jay-Z, (1968- ) Actress and supermodel Tyra Banks (1973- ) American actress Marisa Tomei (1964- ) Actor Orlando Brown (1987- )


Islamic History (Part 2)

Event of Interest

1988-12-01 Benazir Bhutto named 1st female Prime Minister of a Muslim country (Pakistan)

Event of Interest

1989-01-14 1,000 muslims burn Salman Rushdies' "Satanic Verses" in Bradford, England

    5 Pakistani Muslim rioters killed protesting "Satanic Verses" novel Retired British pilot Jack Mann is kidnapped by Islamic fundamentalists Turning point in the exodus of hundreds of thousands of Kashmiri Hindus from Indian-administrated Kashmir due to violence from Muslim militants The Massacre of more than 127 Muslims in North East Sri Lanka by paramilitaries. Hindu-Muslim rebellion in Hyderabad-Aligargh India, 140 die Sudan's government imposes Islamic law nationwide, worsening the civil war between the country's Muslim north and Christian south. The Establishment of Islamic Constitutional Movement - Hadas in Kuwait.

Nobel Prize

2003-10-10 Shirin Ebadi is awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for her significant and pioneering efforts for democracy and human rights, making her the 1st Iranian Muslim women to receive the prize

    Ahmed Yassin, co-founder and leader of the Palestinian Sunni Islamist militant group Hamas, and bodyguards killed in the Gaza Strip by Israeli Air Force AH-64 Apache fired Hellfire missiles Islamist terrorists involved in the 11 March 2004 Madrid attacks attempt to bomb the Spanish high-speed train AVE near Madrid. Their attack is thwarted. Islamic terrorists involved in the 11 March 2004 Madrid attacks are trapped by the police in their apartment and kill themselves

Event of Interest

2014-06-29 Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi announces establishment of worldwide "caliphate" at the Great Mosque of al-Nuri in Mosul, Iraq

    Hamas and Islamic Jihad offer Israel a 10-year truce with 10 conditions, which include lifting the blockade and the release of prisoners it is rejected Israeli airstrike kills leader of Islamic Jihad's military wing, Salah Abu Hassanein

Event of Interest

2014-11-05 New Zealand Prime Minister John Key rules out sending troops to fight against Islamic State, but claims there are 40 New Zealanders on 'terror watchlist'

Event of Interest

2014-11-08 US President Obama authorises deployment of 1,500 additional troops to help train and advise Iraqi and Kurdish forces fighting Islamic State militants

    United States lead air strikes in the northern Iraqi city of Mosul against Islamic State (IS) An adviser to the Kenyan president says the slaughter of 28 people on a bus by the Somali militant Islamist group al-Shabab is intended to create a religious war in the country The British Government announces it will send hundreds of troops to Iraq, to train Iraqi and Kurdish forces in the conflict with Islamic State -8th Islamic State militants ransack and destroy ancient cities of Nimrud, Hatra and Dur-Sharrukin in Iraq

Event of Interest

2015-11-23 President Yahya Jammeh of Gambia bans "Khatna", the Islamic ritual practice of genital mutilation of young girls [1]

Event of Interest

2015-12-07 US Presidential candidate Donald Trump proposes banning all Muslims from entering the US


"The Charbor Chronicles"

Once again, it should be reiterated, that this does not pretend to be a very extensive history of what happened on this day (nor is it the most original - the links can be found down below). If you know something that I am missing, by all means, shoot me an email or leave a comment, and let me know!


Dec 4, 1942: Polish Christians come to the aid of Polish Jews

On this day in Warsaw, a group of Polish Christians put their own lives at risk when they set up the Council for the Assistance of the Jews. The group was led by two women, Zofia Kossak and Wanda Filipowicz.

Since the German invasion of Poland in 1939, the Jewish population had been either thrust into ghettos, transported to concentration and labor camps, or murdered. Jewish homes and shops were confiscated and synagogues were burned to the ground. Word about the Jews' fate finally leaked out in June of 1942, when a Warsaw underground newspaper, the Liberty Brigade, made public the news that tens of thousands of Jews were being gassed at Chelmno, a death camp in Poland—almost seven months after the extermination of prisoners began.

Despite the growing public knowledge of the "Final Solution," the mass extermination of European Jewry and the growing network of extermination camps in Poland, little was done to stop it. Outside Poland, there were only angry speeches from politicians and promises of postwar reprisals. Within Poland, non-Jewish Poles were themselves often the objects of persecution and forced labor at the hands of their Nazi occupiers being Slavs, they too were considered "inferior" to the Aryan Germans.

But this did not stop Zofia Kossak and Wanda Filipowicz, two Polish Christians who were determined to do what they could to protect their Jewish neighbors. The fates of Kossak and Filipowicz are unclear so it is uncertain whether their mission was successful, but the very fact that they established the Council is evidence that some brave souls were willing to risk everything to help persecuted Jews. Kossak and Filipowicz were not alone in their struggle to help in fact, only two days after the Council was established, the SS, Hitler's "political" terror police force, rounded up 23 men, women, and children, and locked some in a cottage and some in a barn—then burned them alive. Their crime: suspicion of harboring Jews.

Despite the bravery of some Polish Christians, and Jewish resistance fighters within the Warsaw ghetto, who rebelled in 1943 (some of whom found refuge among their Christian neighbors as they attempted to elude the SS), the Nazi death machine proved overwhelming. Poland became the killing ground for not only Poland's Jewish citizens, but much of Europe's: Approximately 4.5 million Jews were killed in Poland's death and labor camps by war's end.





Dec 4, 1945: Senate approves U.S. participation in United Nations

In an overwhelming vote of 65 to 7, the U.S. Senate approves full U.S. participation in the United Nations. The United Nations had officially came into existence on October 24, 1945, when its charter was ratified by China, France, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, the United States and a majority of other signatories. Senate approval meant the U.S. could join most of the world's nations in the international organization, which aimed to arbitrate differences between countries and stem military aggression.

In approving U.S. participation in the United Nations, the Senate argued fiercely on a number of issues. Some senators proposed a resolution designed to force the president to receive congressional consent before approving U.S. troops for any U.N. peacekeeping forces. This resolution was defeated. The Senate also defeated a proposal by Senator Robert Taft that the United States urge its U.N. representatives to seek "immediate action" on arms control and possible prohibition of weapons such as atomic bombs.

The Senate action marked a tremendous change in the U.S. attitude toward international organizations. In the post-World War I period, the Senate acted to block U.S. participation in the newly established League of Nations. With the horrors of World War II as a backdrop, however, the Senate and the American people seemed willing to place some degree of trust in an even more powerful organization, the United Nations. The United Nations provided a forum for some of the most dramatic episodes in Cold War history. In 1950, the Security Council, prodded by the United States and with the Russian delegation absent, approved a peacekeeping force for Korea. This was the first time a UN peacekeeping force was committed to an armed conflict. The U.N. also allowed world leaders to observe each other as never before, as in the 1961 incident when Russian leader Nikita Khrushchev presented an unforgettable spectacle by taking off one of his shoes and pounding his table with it for emphasis during a U.N. debate.






Dec 4, 1917: Psychiatrist reports on the phenomenon of shell shock

Well-known psychiatrist W.H. Rivers presents his report The Repression of War Experience, based on his work at Britain s Craiglockhart War Hospital for Neurasthenic Officers, to the Royal School of Medicine, on this day in 1917. Craiglockhart, near Edinburgh, was one of the most famous hospitals used to treat soldiers who suffered from psychological traumas as a result of their service on the battlefield.

By the end of World War I, the army had been forced to deal with 80,000 cases of "shell shock," a term first used in 1917 by a medical officer named Charles Myers to describe the physical damage done to soldiers on the front lines during exposure to heavy bombardment. It soon became clear, however, that the various symptoms of shell shock?including debilitating anxiety, persistent nightmares, and physical afflictions ranging from diarrhea to loss of sight?were appearing even in soldiers who had never been directly under bombardment, and the meaning of the term was broadened to include not only the physical but the psychological effects produced by the experience of combat.

The most important duty of doctors like Rivers, as prescribed by the British army, was to get the men fit and ready to return to battle. Nevertheless, only one-fifth of the men treated in hospitals for shell shock ever resumed military duty. Rivers's patients included the poets Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen, who later wrote of his fellow inmates of Craiglockhart: These are men whose minds the Dead have ravished/Memory fingers in their hair of murders/Multitudinous murders they once witnessed.








Dec 4, 1780: Washington's cousin tricks Loyalists

A force of Continental dragoons commanded by Colonel William Washington--General George Washington's second cousin once removed--corners Loyalist Colonel Rowland Rugeley and his followers in Rugeley's house and barn near Camden, South Carolina, on this day in 1780.

After nearly a year of brutal backcountry conflict between Washington and the fierce British commander Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton (who was infamous for Tarleton's Quarter, the murder of colonial POWs on May 29, 1780 at Waxhaws), Washington had retreated to North Carolina the previous October. Commanded to return to the South Carolina theater by Brigadier General Daniel The Old Wagoner Morgan, Colonel Washington still lacked the proper artillery to dislodge the Loyalists. He told his cavalrymen to dismount and surround the barn. While out of Rugeley's sight, Washington's men fabricated a pine log to resemble a cannon.

This Quaker gun trick, named so because Quakers used it to be intimidating without breaching their pacifist vow of non-violence, worked beautifully. Washington faced the cannon toward the buildings in which the Loyalists had barricaded themselves and threatened bombardment if they did not surrender. Shortly after, Rugeley surrendered his entire force without a single shot being fired. When informed of the pacifist victory, General Charles Cornwallis, commander of the British armies in America, informed Tarleton that Rugeley's performance ensured he would never rise to the rank of brigadier. A few weeks later, Tarleton would himself face an even worse humiliation at the hands of General Morgan during the devastating Battle of Cowpens. The harrowing civil war for the hearts and minds of the Carolina backcountry had finally begun to favor the Patriots.


Here's a more detailed look at events that transpired on this date throughout history:


The almanac

Today is Thursday, Dec. 4, the 339th day of 2008 with 27 to follow.

The moon is waxing. The morning star is Saturn. The evening stars are Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune.

Those born on this date are under the sign of Sagittarius. They include Scottish historian Thomas Carlyle in 1795 English novelist Samuel Butler in 1835 actress/singer Lillian Russell in 1861 Spanish dictator Francisco Franco in 1892 U.S. Marines fighter ace Gregory "Pappy" Boyington in 1912 actress Deanna Durbin in 1921 (age 87) actors Max Baer Jr. in 1937 (age 71) and Jeff Bridges in 1949 (age 59) actresses Patricia Wettig in 1951 (age 57) and Marisa Tomei in 1964 (age 44) and model Tyra Banks in 1973 (age 35).

In 1942, U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered liquidation of the Works Progress Administration, created during the Depression to provide work for the unemployed.

In 1971, India joined East Pakistan in its war for independence from West Pakistan. East Pakistan became the republic of Bangladesh.

n 1991, American Terry Anderson was freed by his pro-Iranian captors after 6 years. He was the last U.S. hostage held in the Middle East.

In 1992, U.S. President George H.W. Bush ordered U.S. troops into Somalia.

In 1995, officials of the United Auto Workers union called an end to a largely unsuccessful 17-month strike against Caterpillar in Peoria, Ill.

In 1997, top health officials in Europe voted to ban most forms of advertising of tobacco beginning in four to five years.

In 2002, a Roman Catholic priest was indicted on seven counts in a seven-month investigation of sex abuse allegations in the Catholic Diocese of Cleveland. Nine others faced charges in the case.

In 2003, an especially virulent strain of the flu hit the United States, mostly in the West at first, with Colorado reporting more than 6,300 cases with the deaths of five children.

In 2004, Colombia extradited to the United States the most notorious drug cartel kingpin in its custody, Gilberto Rodriguez Orejuela, a co-founder of the notorious Cali cartel.

In 2005, New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin urged Hurricane Katrina evacuees to return but many were reported skeptical about what they would find there.

Also in 2005, the remains of at least 20 people were found in a grave in east Lebanon near a former Syrian-run prison where many Lebanese detainees were held.

In 2006, John Bolton resigned as U.S. envoy to the United Nations. Named to the post through a recess appointment by U.S. President George Bush, Bolton had been a harsh critic of U.N. bureaucracy.

In 2007, a Washington report says the pending U.S. election may be dashing balanced-budget hopes as Congress works to please voters instead of making tough fiscal choices.

Also in 2007, six students were killed and four others were hurt when a bomb went off at an Islamic school in Pakistan's Balochistan Province.

A thought for the day: Scottish historian Thomas Carlyle said, "A well-written life is almost as rare as a well-spent one."


At midnight in Iraq, the United Nations deadline for the Iraqi withdrawal from Kuwait expires, and the Pentagon prepares to commence offensive operations to forcibly eject Iraq from its five-month occupation of its oil-rich neighbor. At 4:30 p.m. EST, the &hellip

Mikhail Gorbachev announces that he is resigning as president of the Soviet Union. In truth, there was not much of a Soviet Union from which to resign—just four days earlier, 11 of the former Soviet republics had established the Commonwealth &hellip


December 4, 1991: Hostage Terry Anderson Freed in Lebanon

On this day in 1991, Islamic militants in Lebanon release kidnapped American journalist Terry Anderson after 2,454 days in captivity.

As chief Middle East correspondent for the Associated Press, Anderson covered the long-running civil war in Lebanon (1975-1990). On March 16, 1985, he was kidnapped on a west Beirut street while leaving a tennis court. His captors took him to the southern suburbs of the city, where he was held prisoner in an underground dungeon for the next six-and-a-half years.

Anderson was one of 92 foreigners (including 17 Americans) abducted during Lebanon’s bitter civil war. The kidnappings were linked to Hezbollah, or the Party of God, a militant Shiite Muslim organization formed in 1982 in reaction to Israel’s military presence in Lebanon. They seized several Americans, including Anderson, soon after Kuwaiti courts jailed 17 Shiites found guilty of bombing the American and French embassies there in 1983. Hezbollah in Lebanon received financial and spiritual support from Iran, where prominent leaders praised the bombers and kidnappers for performing their duty to Islam.


The Almanac

Today is Saturday, Dec. 4, the 339th day of 2004 with 27 to follow.

The moon is waning. The morning stars are Jupiter, Saturn, Venus and Mars. The evening stars are Mercury, Pluto, Uranus and Neptune.

Those born on this date are under the sign of Sagittarius. They include Scottish historian Thomas Carlyle in 1795 English novelist Samuel Butler in 1835 actress/singer Lillian Russell in 1861 Spanish dictator Francisco Franco in 1892 Gregory "Pappy" Boyington in 1912 actress Deanna Durbin in 1921 (age 83) actors Max Baer Jr. in 1937 (age 67) and Jeff Bridges in 1949 (age 55) actresses Patricia Wettig in 1951 (age 53) and Marisa Tomei in 1964 (age 40) and model Tyra Banks in 1973 (age 31).

In 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered liquidation of the Works Progress Administration, created during the Depression to provide work for the unemployed.

In 1971, India joined East Pakistan in its war for independence from West Pakistan. East Pakistan became the republic of Bangladesh.

In 1991, former Lincoln Savings & Loan Association Dhairman Charles Keating was convicted on 17 counts of securities fraud.

Also in 1991, American Terry Anderson was freed by his pro-Iranian captors after 6 years. He was the last U.S. hostage held in the Middle East.

In 1992, President George H. Bush ordered U.S. troops into Somalia.

In 1995, officials of the United Auto Workers union called an end to a largely unsuccessful 17-month-long strike against Caterpiller in Peoria, Ill.

In 1996, Jonathan Schmitz was sentenced in the slaying of Scott Amedure, who had confessed to having a crush on Schmitz during the taping of "The Jenny Jones Show." The segment never aired.

In 1997, top health officials in Europe voted to ban most forms of advertising of tobacco beginning in four to five years.

In 1998, the space shuttle Endeavor blasted off, carrying into orbit a U.S. component of the International Space Station.

In 2002, a Roman Catholic priest was indicted on seven counts in a seven-month investigation of sex abuse allegations in the Catholic Diocese of Cleveland. Nine others faced charges in the case.

In 2003, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld flew to Afghanistan to meet with President Karzai and others amid reports of a growing number af attacks on U.S. forces.

A thought for the day: Scottish historian Thomas Carlyle said, "A well-written Life is almost as rare as a well-spent one."


Today in History - Historical Events - December 4th

1992 Somali Civil War: President George H. W. Bush orders 28,000 US troops to Somalia in Northeast Africa.

1961 Floyd Patterson KOs Tom McNeeley in 4 for heavyweight boxing title

1985 President Reagan appoints Vice Adm John Poindexter as security adviser

1943 -Dec 6] 2nd conference of Cairo: FDR, Churchill & Turkish pres Inonu

1961 Museum of Modern Art hangs Matisse's Le Bateau upside down for 47 days

1844 James K. Polk elected 11th US President

1951 Aaron Copland's/Robbins' "Pied Piper" premieres in NYC

1981 Reagan Executive Order on Intelligence (No 12333) that allows CIA to engage in domestic counter-intelligence

1914 Walter Johnson accepts money from Federal League Chicago Whales Clark Griffith threatens to take Johnson to court

1816 James Monroe (VA), elected 5th pres, defeating Federalist Rufus King

1942 FDR orders dismantling of Works Progress Administration

1927 Duke Ellington opens at Cotton Club in Harlem

1986 Neil Simon's "Broadway Bound" premieres in NYC

1963 Aldo Moro forms Italian government (1963-1968)

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This Day in History: 12/04/1991- Hostage Terry Anderson Freed - HISTORY

Shiite Muslim kidnappers in Lebanon free Anglican Church envoy Terry Waite after more than four years of captivity. Waite, looking thinner and his hair grayer, was freed along with American educator Thomas M. Sutherland after intense negotiations by the United Nations.
Waite, special envoy of the archbishop of Canterbury, had secured the release of missionaries detained in Iran after the Islamic revolution. He also extracted British hostages from Libya and even succeeded in releasing American hostages from Lebanon in 1986.

A total of 10 captives were released through Waite's efforts before Shiite Muslims seized him during a return mission to Beirut on January 20, 1987. He was held captive for more than four years before he was finally released.

During captivity, Waite said he was frequently blindfolded, beaten and subjected to mock executions. He spent much of the time chained to a radiator, suffered from asthma and was transported in a giant refrigerator as his captors moved him about.
Waite, 52, made an impromptu, chaotic appearance before reporters in Damascus after his release to Syrian officials. He said one of his captors expressed regret as he informed Waite he was about to be released.
"He also said to me: 'We apologize for having captured you. We recognize that now this was a wrong thing to do, that holding hostages achieves no useful, constructive purpose,'" Waite said.
The release of Waite and Sutherland left five Western hostages left in Beirut—three Americans, including Terry Anderson, and two Germans. The Americans would be released by December 1991, the Germans in June 1992.

Some 96 foreign hostages were taken and held during the Lebanon hostage crisis between 1982 and 1992. The victims were mostly from Western countries, and mostly journalists, diplomats or teachers. Twenty-five of them were Americans. At least 10 hostages died in captivity. Some were murdered and others died from lack of adequate medical attention to illnesses.
The hostages were originally taken to serve as insurance against retaliation against Hezbollah, which was thought to be responsible for the killing of over 300 Americans in the Marine barracks and embassy bombings in Beirut. It was widely believed that Iran and Syria also played a role in the kidnappings.


Watch the video: Ex-hostage Terry Anderson: I almost went insane