State International Airport: Borispol - Kiev, - History

State International Airport: Borispol - Kiev,  - History


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State International Airport: Borispol - Kiev, Ukraine

The largest airport in the Ukraine, International Airport Borispol, was first opened in May of 1965 on the base of the Borispol Airfield. The Ukraine gained its independence in 1991, and in 1993 the airport became a self-supporting enterprise. Borispol handles the flights of over thirty-two foreign airlines and thirty-eight Ukrainian airlines. In 1995 1,307,699 passengers traveled through. A continued increase in airline traffic necessitated the reconstruction of the main passenger terminal building, and the airport is now capable of handling as many as seven hundred passengers per hour - more than two million passengers a year. The airport's two runways, one of which is currently under construction, will be able to accept all types of aircraft by 1997. Future developments include the addition of a modern cargo terminal, aprons, and a railway link.


Kyiv International Airport (Zhuliany)

Igor Sikorsky Kyiv International Airport (Zhuliany) (Ukrainian: Міжнародний аеропорт «Київ» імені Ігоря Сікорського (Жуляни) ) (IATA: IEV, ICAO: UKKK) is one of the two passenger airports of the Ukrainian capital Kyiv, the other being Boryspil International Airport. It is owned by the municipality of Kyiv and located in the Zhuliany neighbourhood, about 7 kilometres (4.3 mi) southwest of the city centre.

Aside from facilitating regular passenger flights, Kyiv International Airport is also the main business aviation airport in Ukraine, and one of the busiest business aviation hubs in Europe. [4]


Boryspil International Airport

Boryspil International Airport (IATA: KBP, ICAO: UKBB) is the main and largest passenger international airport of Ukraine, which provides about 60% of all air passenger traffic in the country. It is the only airport in Ukraine, which has a transcontinental status. Boryspil International Airport serves more than 12 million national and foreign passengers annually.

The airport is located about 29 km south-east of Kyiv and 6 km from the center of Boryspil. Passenger terminals and the railway station “Boryspil-airport” are located on the territory of the city of Boryspil, and the runways are located within the Boryspil district of the Kyiv region.

Boryspil is conveniently located at the intersection of a lot of air routes connecting Asia with Europe and America. More than 40 national and foreign airlines carry out passenger and cargo transportation from Boryspil International Airport.

Boryspil International Airport has two runways (4,000 m and 3,500 m) and four passenger terminals (among which only two new ones, “D” and “F” are in operation). The technical capabilities of this airport are unique not only for Ukraine, but also for other countries of the former USSR and Eastern Europe. The main runway is capable of receiving aircraft of all types around the clock even in conditions of limited visibility during bad weather and ice.

The high-speed express train Kyiv-Boryspil Airport runs around the clock and stops at the following stations: Boryspil Airport, Darnitsa, Kyiv-Passenger. You can reach the airport in 35 minutes. Also there are regular buses available.


Boryspil International Airport

Boryspil International Airport (Ukrainian: Міжнародний аеропорт «Бориспіль» ) (IATA: KBP, ICAO: UKBB) is an international airport in Boryspil, 29 km (18 mi) east [2] of Kyiv, the capital of Ukraine. It is the country's largest airport, serving 65% of its passenger air traffic, including all its intercontinental flights and a majority of international flights. [4] [5] It is one of two passenger airports that serve Kyiv along with the smaller Zhuliany Airport. Boryspil International Airport is a member of Airports Council International.

History

Early years

On 22 June 1959, the Council of Ministers of the Ukrainian SSR ordered the establishment of regular civil air traffic to the then military airfield near Boryspil. On 7 July 1959, the new airport (named Kyiv-Tsentralnyi) received its first scheduled flight. It was Aeroflot's Tupolev Tu-104 en route from Moscow, carrying 100 passengers and about 1,600 kg of cargo. The first routes served were Moscow–Kyiv-Moscow and Leningrad–Kyiv–Leningrad.

In November 1960, the first permanent air group, consisting of Tu-104 and Antonov An-10 planes, was assigned to the airport. Until then it had been served only by aircraft based in Moscow and other cities of the Soviet Union. A new passenger terminal was opened in 1965. Later that year, an automatic landing assistance system was installed.

In 1963, the Ukrainian Territorial Administration of Civil Aviation formed its Boryspil subdivision consisting of the airport and its air group. The air group grew significantly in the 1960s and 1970s. In 1974 it consisted of four fleets of turbojet aircraft (Tu-104 planes), turbofan aircraft (Tu-134, Tu-154 planes) and two fleets of turboprop aircraft (Ilyushin Il-18 planes).

Toward the final decades of the Cold War, the Soviet Air Force maintained a presence at Boryspil Airport with 1 VTAP (1st Military Aviation Transportation Regiment) flying Ilyushin Il-76 cargo jets.

By the 1980s, Boryspil had begun receiving limited international flights. Additional passenger services and customs/border control groups were established for that purpose. However, ordinary Soviet citizens were not allowed to depart abroad from Kyiv, being restricted to fly only from Moscow airports. [ citation needed ]

Development since the 1990s

In 1993, the Ministry of Transportation of the newly independent Ukraine reorganized the airport into the Boryspil State International Airport and created a local subdivision of Air Ukraine to serve it. The airport was opened for any passengers and flights. The number of air and passenger traffic has been growing ever since.

Early in the 2000s, Boryspil became a hub airport serving destined and transit flights of foreign airlines. Its development strategy stresses the hub role since domestic passenger demand is growing insufficiently compared to the possible transit traffic. In 2001, a new runway was completed, and the airport carried 1.5 million passengers. [6] It is certified for Category III A ILS approaches. In 2002, Boryspil airport was certified under the ISO 9001 quality management system.

It is one of Eastern Europe's largest airports with over 6 million passengers traveling in 2008. [7] It consistently accounted for between 60% and 70% of Ukraine's air travel demand and, despite a drop of 13% in 2009, it handled 5.8 million passengers, more than it handled in 2007. [8]

The airport survived the 2012 European cold wave without major flight delays or cancellations. [9] According to the media and industry experts, in 2013 once underdog in-city Zhuliany Airport has rapidly grown into a major, and more efficient, competitor to the still-leading Boryspil Airport. [10]

Ongoing development

Boryspil International Airport handles most of Ukraine's international traffic. Terminal B, with only eleven gates, two of which were air bridges, was not enough to handle all international flights. This was the reason for the expansion of that terminal, which started in 2005. The first-stage expansion of Terminal B was opened on 27 January 2006. In 2008, passport control within Terminal B Departures was moved further east (along with the entrance to the main duty-free shop so that it remains airside).

There are plans to expand the airport further by building several new terminals. The government has been having meetings with the owners of nearby land, trying to buy more land for expansion. The construction of Terminal D was approved on 28 July 2008 and was completed in 2012 at a cost of UAH 1.661 billion (US$208 million). The terminal will have a capacity of 1,500 passengers per hour and cover an area of 44.9 hectares. [11] Platform M, which is connected to Terminal B and requires redevelopment, was to be reconstructed in 2009-2010. The reason for the delay in its reconstruction was the fact that Terminal B needs to be fully operational first. Now that Terminal D has opened (building began on 24 October 2008 [12] ), platform M can be reconstructed without having a major impact on traffic.

The construction of Terminal D was completed in 2012, with the terminal opening to passengers on 28 May 2012, increasing passenger handling facilities significantly. As of 24 June 2016, Terminal A, B, and F are out of operation. By 2020, if all plans proceed, the airport should have a capacity of 18 million passengers per year. [6]

Terminals and infrastructure

Terminals

Boryspil International Airport has two operational passenger terminals (D) and (F), one cargo terminal, and a VIP terminal. The largely overcrowded former domestic Terminal A was closed on 15 September 2011, in favor of transferring all domestic operations to nearby Terminal B. In 2013, all domestic and international operations were transferred from Terminal B to Terminal D.

Terminal "A" specialized in servicing air passengers traveling through the territory of Ukraine. There was a waiting room (2nd floor), toilet (ground floor), currency exchange offices and air tickets. The terminal also housed representative offices of domestic airlines. There were cafes and guarded car parks near Terminal A, as well as airport lockers.

Most flights were operated by AeroSvit and Dniproavia, and Terminal A also served domestic flights of passengers of Ukraine International Airlines and Motor-Sich.

From 15 September 2011, all domestic flights from Boryspil are operated from Terminal B, and Terminal A is closed. Minister of Transport and Communications of Ukraine Kostiantyn Yefimenko said that in 2018, terminals "A" and "B" of Boryspil Airport are planned to be demolished to build a new terminal.

Terminal B, the original Soviet-constructed building, used to serve domestic and international flights. It has undergone extensive, long-term reconstruction. The terminal hosted shops, cafes, travel agencies and banks, as well as offices of airlines and a business center. The ground floor features luggage storage, waiting-area, and check-in desks, whilst security and passport (immigration) control, the main departure lounge and the terminal's boarding gates are on the second floor. After passport control, passengers wait in the departure lounge where there is a business lounge, a number of cafes, restaurants and duty-free shops. There is free Wi-Fi access in the building. [13] The terminal has two jetbridges and several bus-boarding stands. It is now used for charter flights for Hasidic Pilgrims participating in Rosh Hashanah kibbutz in Ukraine.

Terminal D, construction of which began on 24 March 2008, [12] was opened on 28 May 2012 with an initial capacity of 3,100 passengers per hour. [14] It received its first arrivals passengers on 29 May 2012.

Terminal D serves domestic and international flights. It is also a hub and a home base of Ukraine International Airlines. It has been designed to support an integrated system for monitoring and directing arriving and departing passengers this has been ensured by implementing a scheme of movement based on the principle of multi-level zoning — departing passengers use the airport's upper floors, whilst those arriving and yet to pass through immigration are processed on a lower level. The ground and first floors are used for airside service and the sorting of baggage. Airside, the first floor is used for arrivals zone and baggage hall. The fourth floor is reserved for airlines' lounges. The terminal can be accessed from the airport's central access road for arrivals and in the same way but via a ramp for departures level. The building features both jetbridges and bus boarding stands and is equipped to handle wide-body aircraft such as Ukraine International Airlines' Boeing 777-200ERs.

The Ukrainian Border Guard and State Customs Service maintain control points for arriving and departing passengers (40 passport booths for arrivals and 28 for departures). The terminal has 11 gates equipped with jetways and additional 'bus gates'.

Terminal D regularly features Ukrainian art exhibitions by such notables as Maria Prymachenko and Yuriy Khimich, organised by the art fund "Artaniya". [15] [16] [17]

Terminal F is a passenger terminal mostly used by low-cost carriers and was opened on 21 September 2010 as a home base for Ukraine International Airlines. [18] Terminal F started handling regular flights as of 31 October 2010, with an initial capacity of 900 passengers/hour. [19] The terminal is not equipped with jetways as it was originally meant to serve low-cost airlines. However, the higher level of service offered led to the transfer of many scheduled European and Asian carriers to the terminal.

The opening of Terminal F greatly reduced the overcrowding at Terminal B, which had previously been Boryspil's only operating international terminal. Upon opening of Terminal F and expansion/reconfiguration of Terminal B's airside departures to serve domestic flights, the airport was able to close the largely outdated domestic Terminal A.

This terminal served UTair-Ukraine, airBaltic, Armavia, Austrian Airlines, Belavia, British Airways, LOT Polish Airlines, Georgian Airways, Libyan Airlines, Lufthansa, Finnair, KLM, S7 Airlines, Turkish Airlines and others. All of them were transferred to Terminal D. Ukraine International Airlines transferred all of its regular flights to Terminal D on 30 May 2013 but UIA's charter flights stayed in Terminal F. It was expected that Terminal F would be also used for low-cost carriers. In October 2013, the terminal was used for charter flights and low-cost airlines it serviced three or four, sometimes eight, flights a day. [4] On 15 October 2003, airport management decided that terminal F will be used as a cargo terminal in the future. [4] On 27 October 2013, all flights were transferred from terminal F to terminal D. [4]

Terminal F was reopened on 31 March 2019, and is used as a passenger facility for low-cost carriers, especially Ryanair. [20] The following airlines have confirmed their move to Terminal F: Ryanair, Yanair, Bravo Airways, Iraqi Airways, SkyUp, Aigle Azur and Air Serbia. [21]

Infrastructure

Boryspil airport has two runways, with the terminals occupying a center-field location.

  • The eastern No. 1 runway (36R-18L) built in 2001 serves majority of flights.
  • The western No. 2 runway (36L-18R).

In the long term, there are plans to build a third crosswind runway. [22]

Short-stay car parking facilities at are provided in the immediate vicinity of terminals B and F, whilst long term parking facilities are in the vicinity of the airport's access road and 'station square'. In addition to these facilities, the airport is, in connection with the construction of Terminal D, building its first multi-storey car park this will be a combined long- and short-stay car park.

Airlines and destinations

Passenger

The following airlines offer regular scheduled and charter services to and from Boryspil International Airport: [23]


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  • King Air 90
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  • Piaggio Avanti II
  • Pilatus PC-12
  • Piper Cheyenne
  • Piper Malibu
  • Piper Matrix
  • Piper Meridian
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VLJ | Light Jets | Super Light

  • Beechjet 400 / 400A
  • Cessna Citation Bravo
  • Cessna Citation CJ
  • Citation CJ2 / CJ2+
  • Citation CJ3 / CJ3+
  • Citation CJ4 / CJ4+
  • Citation Encore
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  • Eclipse 500
  • Hawker 400XP
  • Honda Jet
  • LearJet 31 / 31A
  • Lear 35 / 35A
  • Lear 40 / 40XR
  • Lear 45 / 45XR (SLJ)
  • Nextant 400XT
  • Phenom 100
  • Phenom 300 (SLJ)

Midsize | Super Midsize Jets

  • Citation Excel / XLS
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  • Citation X (10)
  • Challenger 300 / 350
  • Falcon 50 / 50EX
  • Gulfstream G150 / G200 / G280
  • Hawker 700
  • Hawker 800 / 800A / 800XP / 850XPi
  • Hawker 900 / 900XP
  • Hawker 1000 / 4000
  • LearJet 55
  • Lear 60 / 60XR
  • Legacy 500

Large | Heavy Jets

  • Challenger 601
  • Challenger 604 | 605
  • Challenger 850
  • Embraer Lineage 1000
  • Falcon 900 / LX
  • Falcon 2000 / EX / LX / LXS
  • Global 5000
  • Gulfstream G450
  • Gulfstream GIV / G4
  • Gulfstream GIV-SP / G4 SP
  • Lear 70 /75
  • Legacy 600
  • Legacy 650

Long Range Jets

  • Falcon 5X
  • Falcon 7X
  • Falcon 8X
  • Global Express / XRS
  • Global 6000
  • Global 7000
  • Global 8000
  • Gulfstream GV / G5
  • Gulfstream G550
  • Gulfstream G600
  • Gulfstream G650 / ER

VIP Airliners

  • Airbus ACJ-318 Elite Corporate Jet
  • Airbus ACJ-319 VIP
  • Airbus ACJ-320 VIP
  • Airbus ACJ-321 VIP
  • Boeing Business Jet BBJ / BBJ2 / BBJ3
  • Boeing B-727 VIP
  • Boeing B-737 VIP
  • Boeing B-747 VIP
  • Boeing B-757 VIP
  • Boeing B-787 Dreamliner VIP
  • Bombardier CRJ-200

Airlines and destinations

Passenger

Airlines Destinations Terminal
Aegean Airlines Athens (begins 28 March 2016) [20] [21]
Seasonal: Larnaca (begins 3 May 2016) [20] [21]
TBA
Air Arabia Sharjah [22] D
Air Astana Almaty D
airBaltic Riga D
Air France Paris-Charles de Gaulle D
Austrian Airlines Vienna
Seasonal: Innsbruck
D
Azerbaijan Airlines Baku D
Belavia Minsk-National D
British Airways London-Heathrow D
Czech Airlines Prague, Košice [23] D
Dniproavia Dnipropetrovsk [24] Ivano-Frankivsk [24] D
Ellinair Athens (begins 30 April 2016), [25] Thessaloniki
Seasonal: Corfu, Heraklion (begins 24 April 2016)
D
Estonian Air Tallinn D
KLM Amsterdam D
LOT Polish Airlines Warsaw-Chopin D
Lufthansa Frankfurt, Munich D
Nouvelair Seasonal: Enfidha D
Royal Jordanian Amman-Queen Alia D
SCAT Shymkent (begins 12 December 2015) [26] D
Taban Air Seasonal: Tehran-Imam Khomeini D
Turkish Airlines Istanbul-Atatürk, Istanbul-Sabiha Gökçen D
Ukraine International Airlines Aktau (begins 18 November 2015), [27] Alicante, [28] Almaty, Amman-Queen Alia, [29] Amsterdam, Astana, Athens, Baku, Bangkok-Suvarnabhumi, [30] Barcelona, Batumi, Beijing-Capital, [31] Berlin-Tegel, Brussels, Chișinău, [32] Dnipropetrovsk, Dubai-International, Frankfurt, Geneva, Helsinki, Istanbul-Atatürk, Ivano-Frankivsk, Kharkiv, Kutaisi, [33] Larnaca, Lisbon, [34] London-Gatwick, Lviv, Madrid, Milan-Malpensa, Minsk-National, [35] Munich, New York-JFK, [36] Odessa, Paris-Charles de Gaulle, Prague, Riga, [37] Rome-Fiumicino, [38] Stockholm-Arlanda, [39] Tbilisi, Tel Aviv-Ben Gurion, Venice (begins 27 March 2016), [40] [41] Vienna, Vilnius, Warsaw-Chopin, Yerevan, Zaporizhia, Zürich
Seasonal: Funchal, Goa, Nice, Palma de Mallorca, Salzburg, Split, Tehran-Imam Khomeini, Thessaloniki
D
UM Airlines Amman-Queen Alia, Beirut, Latakia, Tehran-Imam Khomeini D
UP
operated by El Al
Tel Aviv-Ben Gurion D
UTair-Ukraine Charter: Antalya, Burgas, Hurghada, Sharm el-Sheikh D
Windrose Airlines Seasonal charter: Antalya, Burgas, Dalaman, Dubai-International, Heraklion, Hurghada, Pula, Sharm el-Sheikh, Split, Tivat, Valencia D

Cargo


State "Research institute of building production named of V.S. Balitsky" (Кyiv)

Purpose is to determine the technical condition of structures of buildings complex.

Main stages are:

  • Development of technical specifications
  • A survey of existing structures of buildings
  • Execution of control measurements of existing structures to establish the volume of performed work
  • Instrumental nondestructive test of strength of materials pivot construction (concrete and brick laying)
  • Fixing and assembly of data of defects and damages
  • Survey of structures volumes
  • Examination of internal and external communications
  • Inspection of fixtures.
  • Making up the report.

As a result of the technical condition it was set designs of buildings by performing visual inspections and instrumental in accessible places. It was determined strength and load-bearing frame structures. It was given recommendations for further safe operation of the building.

2. Сomprehensive research of defects and damage of coverage apron «D» of “Borispol” airport and the development of technological solutions to rehabilitation and remediation activities.

A comprehensive study of defects and damage coverage apron «D» airport “Borispol” and developed technological solutions with the rehabilitation and reconstruction activities.

Comprehensive study of the existing airfield concrete coating performed on the program developed by the department of SE “RIBP”

According to the program it was made following works:

an analysis of the nature of the destruction of concrete pavement platform defined by the presence of corrosion of concrete in all areas of coverage and identified the type of corrosion it was chosen way of covering surface preparation of concrete apron to repair selected materials to restore the performance of the platform cover and conducted tests of samples treated with these materials it was established research areas arranged on the prepared surface coating platform using the most suitable materials that determination on the basis of the studies and tests to the technology of the repair works and confirm the suitability of selected materials recommendations of the repair work platform coverage.

Execution: specialists of inspection sector of construction costs, regulation and development budgets DC “NDIBV” under the direction of head. Yachmeneva Yulia’s Sector.

Main stages:

  • Analysis of design documentation.
  • Inspection of design documentation.
  • Development cost estimates for building works.
  • Design estimates for electrical work – internal network.
  • Design estimates for temporary structures
  • Development of consolidated estimated calculation.
  • Development estimates stage “RP” in “Overhaul twill weave stained glass window of the terminal” B “in the axes” A “-” 14-22 “SE IA” Boryspil “.”
  • Reconciliation of consolidated estimated calculation with customer.
  • Passing the examination of the project in SE “Ukrderzhbudekspertiza” Obtaining a positive report.

Results – It was compiled estimates in accordance with all requirements and regulations applicable law. The positive report from the expert organizations.


BORYSPIL AIRPORT DEVELOPMENT

The project comprises the delivery of the initial phase of Kyiv Boryspil Airport (KBP) capital investment plan. It consists of a number of infrastructure enhancements at KBP designed to ensure that the highest levels of aviation safety and security are preserved and strengthen its operational resilience. Major works include the rehabilitation of the western airfield system, including the western runway (18R-36L), which has been operating for more than 50 years and is in poor condition, the associated parallel taxiway, the airfield ground lighting and the instrument landing systems, plus a range of other associated airside infrastructure works.

Objectives

The project is designed to strengthen the airport's operational resilience and ensure that the highest levels of aviation safety and security are preserved. Major works include the rehabilitation of the western runway (18R-36L), plus a range of other associated airside infrastructure works.

Comments

This operation is covered by the EU Guarantee for EIB loans outside the EU.

Sector(s)

Under ELM Guarantee

This operation is covered by the ELM Guarantee.

Proposed EIB finance (Approximate amount)

Total cost (Approximate amount)

Environmental aspects

If situated in the EU, the new runway construction component would fall under Annex I of the EIA Directive 2011/92/EU requiring a full Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA). The environmental process followed for the individual project components and the compliance with the Bank's environmental and social standards will be assessed during the project appraisal.

Procurement

The Promoter has to ensure that any procurement procedures are done in accordance with the EIB's Guide to Procurement and the relevant applicable EU public procurement rules.


Contents

Early years

On 22 June 1959, the Council of Ministers of the Ukrainian SSR ordered the establishment of regular civil air traffic to the then military airfield near Boryspil. On 7 July 1959 the new airport (named Kyiv-Tsentralnyi) received its first scheduled flight. It was Aeroflot's Tupolev Tu-104 en route from Moscow, carrying 100 passengers and about 3,500 pounds (1,600 kg) of cargo. The first routes served were Moscow–Kiev-Moscow and Leningrad–Kiev–Leningrad.

In November 1960, the first permanent air group, consisting of Tu-104 and Antonov An-10 planes, was assigned to the airport. Until then it had been served only by aircraft based in Moscow and other cities of the Soviet Union. A new passenger terminal was opened in 1965. Later that year, an automatic landing assistance system was installed .

In 1963, the Ukrainian Territorial Administration of Civil Aviation formed its Boryspil subdivision consisting of the airport and its air group. The air group grew significantly in the 1960s and 1970s. In 1974 it consisted of four fleets of turbojet aircraft (Tu-104 planes), turbofan aircraft (Tu-134, Tu-154 planes) and two fleets of turboprop aircraft (Ilyushin Il-18 planes).

Toward the final decades of the Cold War, the Soviet Air Force maintained a presence at Boryspil Airport with 1 VTAP (1st Military Aviation Transportation Regiment) flying Ilyushin Il-76 cargo jets.

By the 1980s, Boryspil had begun receiving limited international flights. Additional passenger services and customs/border control groups were established for that purpose. However, ordinary Soviet citizens were not allowed to depart abroad from Kiev, instead being restricted to flying only from Moscow airports. [ citation needed ]

In the late 1980s, Mikheil Saakashvili, the former president of Georgia, served his conscript service in the Soviet border guard's Boryspil Separate Group that was maintaining border control in the airport.

Development since the 1990s

In 1993, the Ministry of Transportation of the newly independent Ukraine reorganized the airport into the Boryspil State International Airport and created a local subdivision of Air Ukraine to serve it. The airport was opened for any passengers and flights. The number of air and passenger traffic has been growing ever since.

Early in the 2000s, Boryspil became a hub airport serving destined and transit flights of foreign airlines. Its development strategy stresses the hub role since domestic passenger demand is growing insufficiently compared to the possible transit traffic.

In 2001, a new runway was completed, and the airport carried 1.5 million passengers. [7] It is certified for Category III A ILS approaches.

In 2002 Boryspil airport was certified under the ISO 9001 quality management system.

It is one of Eastern Europe's largest airports with over 6 million passengers travelling in 2008. [8] It consistently accounted for between 60% and 70% of Ukraine’s air travel demand and, despite a drop of 13% in 2009, it handled 5.8 million passengers, more than it handled in 2007. [9]

The airport survived the 2012 European cold wave without major flight delays or cancellations. [10] According to the media and industry experts, in 2013 once underdog in-city Zhulyany Airport has rapidly grown into a major, and more efficient, competitor to the still-leading Boryspil Airport. [11]

Ongoing development

Boryspil International Airport handles most of Ukraine's international traffic. Terminal B, with only eleven gates, two of which were air bridges, was not enough to handle all international flights. This was the reason for the expansion of that terminal, which started in 2005. The first-stage expansion of Terminal B was opened on 27 January 2006. In 2008, passport control within Terminal B Departures was moved further east (along with the entrance to the main duty-free shop so that it remains airside).

There are plans to expand the airport further by building several new terminals. The government has been having meetings with the owners of nearby land, trying to buy more land for expansion. The construction of Terminal D was approved on 28 July 2008 and was completed in 2012 at a cost of UAH 1.661 billion (USD 208 million). The terminal will have a capacity of 1,500 passengers per hour and cover an area of 44.9 hectares. [12] Platform M, which is connected to Terminal B and requires redevelopment, was to be reconstructed in 2009-2010. The reason for the delay in its reconstruction was the fact that Terminal B needs to be fully operational first. Now that Terminal D has opened (building began on 24 October 2008 [13] ), platform M can be reconstructed without having a major impact on traffic.

A new runway will be constructed from 2012 to 2014. The construction of Terminal D was completed in 2012, with the terminal opening to passengers on 28 May 2012, increasing passenger handling facilities significantly. As of November 1, 2010, Terminal F is in operation. By 2020, if all plans proceed, the airport should have a capacity of 18 million passengers per year. [7]


Watch the video: Boryspil international airport in Kyiv in 2021 - WHAT IS UKRAINE