Wolfgang zu Putlitz

Wolfgang zu Putlitz


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Wolfgang zu Putlitz was born in Lukman on 16th July 1899. He arrived in London in 1924 to learn English. He return to Germany where he joined the diplomatic service. In 1935 he was appointed as First Secretary at the German Embassy. He resumed his friendship with Jona von Ustinov, a journalist working in London.

Soon after arriving Putlitz and Ustinov were recruited by MI5. They were both strongly anti-Nazi and it is believed they were persuaded to leak information by Robert Vansittart, permanent under-secretary at the Foreign Office. According to Christopher Andrew, the author of The Defence of the Realm: The Authorized History of MI5 (2009): "Vansittart put Kell in touch with Ustinov, doubtless intending the Security Service to use him as its point of contact with Putlitz. Ironically, in view of the fact that Vansittart listed homosexuality (along with Communism and Deutschism) as one of his three pet hates, Putlitz was gay; his partner, Willy Schneider, also acted as his valet."

Putlitz later recalled: "I would unburden myself of all the dirty schemes and secrets which I encountered as part of my daily routine at the Embassy. By this means I was able to lighten my conscience by the feeling that I was really helping to damage the Nazi cause for I knew Ustinov was in touch with Vansittart, who could use these facts to influence British policy." Putlitz insisted that the only way to deal with Adolf Hitler was to stand firm.

Putlitz provided information that suggested that Wallis Simpson was was a Nazi collaborator. This view was supported by the Russian secret agent Anatoly Baykalov, had obtained this information, while posing as a White Russian, in the group that included Anna Wolkoff (she was Wallis's dressmaker). Richard Deacon, the author of The British Connection (1979) has argued: "Baykalov reported to MI5 that Mrs Simpson was a secret agent of the Germans. He noted that she was very frequently at the German embassy... The information was passed to Baldwin by his Secret Service Liaison Minister, J. C. Davidson."

In April 1936 Joachim von Ribbentrop, arrived as the new German ambassador in Germany. Ribbentrop soon identified Robert Vansittart as the major problem and told Berlin that his mission in London would be very difficult. He later commented: "Never was a conversation so barren, never did I find so little response... One thing was clear, an Anglo-German understanding with Vansittart in office was out of the question." He then talked to Geoffrey Dawson about the possibility of meeting Stanley Baldwin. Dawson told him that he saw no prospect of a meeting with Baldwin before July or August. When the ambassador did meet Baldwin he stated that the "old fool does not know what he is talking about".

Putlitz reported that Ribbentrop's arrival transformed the previously staid atmosphere on the London embassy into a "complete madhouse". Ribbentrop had brought with him a team of SS officers who carried out searches in the desks of officials every night. He also informed MI5 that Ribbentrop had said that an invasion of the Soviet Union as being "as certain as the Amen in church" and that he was confident that the British government "would not lift a finger" to prevent this. Chapman Pincher, the author of Their Trade is Treachery (1981) Putlitz was also passing information to Winston Churchill: "It was through Putlitz that Winston Churchill, when outside the government, obtained his accurate information about the true strength of the Luftwaffe, which he used to attack Neville Chamberlain in Parliament."

Ribbentrop also took a keen interest in the problems of King Edward VIII. Putlitz claimed that Ribbentrop sent him a message that the "German people stood behind him in his struggle". Ribbentrop also told his staff "you will see, Gentlemen, that he is going to win the battle against the plotters". Ribbentrop was furious when the king abdicated in December 1936 and blamed "the machinations of dark Bolshevists powers against the Führer-will of the young King" and informed his staff: "I shall report all further details orally to my Führer."

Putlitz reported that Joachim von Ribbentrop was pleased when Neville Chamberlain became prime minister. "He (Ribbentrop) regarded Mr Chamberlain as pro-German and said he would be his own Foreign Minister. While he would not dismiss Mr Eden he would deprive him of his influence at the Foreign Office. Mr Eden was regarded as an enemy of Germany." Chamberlain did indeed dominate the making of British foreign policy and Anthony Eden eventually resigned in February 1938, exasperated by the Prime Minister's interference in diplomatic business. He was succeeded as foreign secretary Lord Halifax, who strongly supported Chamberlain's appeasement policy. Putlitz constantly warned MI5 that "Britain was letting the trump cards fall out of her hands. If she had adopted, or even now adopted, a firm attitude and threatened war, Hitler would not succeed in this kind of bluff. The German army was not ready for war."

In February 1938, Adolf Hitler appointed Ribbentrop as his foreign minister. Jona von Ustinov summed up Putlitz's view of this appointment: "The German Army will in future be the obedient instrument of Nazi foreign policy. Under Ribbentrop this foreign policy will be an aggressive, forward policy. Its first aim - Austria - has been partly achieved... Austria falls to Hitler like a ripe fruit. After consolidating the position in Austria the next step will be against Czechoslovakia."

Putlitz continued to work at the German embassy until May 1938 when he was posted to The Hague. To maintain regular contact with Putlitz, Ustinov found a job as the European correspondent of an Indian newspaper with an office in the city. According to Christopher Andrew, the author of The Defence of the Realm: The Authorized History of MI5 (2009): "During the summer of 1938 Whitehall received a series of intelligence reports, some of them from Putlitz, warning that Hitler had decided to seize the German-speaking Czech Sudetenland by force." Ustinov reported that General Geyr von Schweppenburg, who had told him: "We simply must convince the British to stand firm... If they give in to Hitler now, there will be no holding him."

International tension increased when Adolf Hitler began demanding that the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia should be under the control of the German government. In an attempt to to solve the crisis, the heads of the governments of Germany, Britain, France and Italy met in Munich. On 29th September, 1938, Neville Chamberlain, Adolf Hitler, Edouard Daladier and Benito Mussolini signed the Munich Agreement which transferred to Germany the Sudetenland, a fortified frontier region that contained a large German-speaking population. When Eduard Benes, Czechoslovakia's head of state, who had not been invited to Munich, protested at this decision, Chamberlain told him that Britain would be unwilling to go to war over the issue of the Sudetenland.

Guy Liddell of MI5 passed an updated digest of Putlitz's intelligence to John Curry, a member of B Branch, who was asked to give it to the Home Secretary, Samuel Hoare, who was part of Chamberlain's inner circle of foreign policy advisers. Hoare was the first former MI5 officer to become a cabinet minister. According to Curry: "As Hoare read it, the colour faded from his cheeks. He made a few brief comments, showed no desire to have the matter discussed or elaborated, and dismissed us." Curry believed that Hoare had been shocked by Putlitz's insistence that "if we had stood firm at Munich, Hitler might have lost the initiative".

Jona von Ustinov reported that Putlitz was extremely disconcerted by the Munich agreement, complaining that, in passing on, at great personal risk, intelligence about Hitler's plans and intentions, he was "sacrificing himself to no purpose". In January 1939, Ustinov arranged for a secret meeting between Putlitz and Robert Vansittart. Putlitz later recalled that Vansittart said: "Well, Putlitz, I understand you are not too pleased with us. I know Munich was a disgraceful business, but I can assure you that this sort of thing is over and done with. Even our English forbearance has its limits. Next time it will be impossible for Chamberlain to allow himself to be bamboozled by a scrap of paper on which Hitler has scribbled a few words expressing his ardent desire for peace." Vansittart also promised Putlitz asylum if he ever decided to defect.

On 20th February, 1939, Vansittart sent Lord Halifax a report, based chiefly on intelligence from Putlitz that Hitler had decided to "liquidate" Czechoslovakia. Vansittart predicted a German coup in Prague during the week of the 12th to the 19th March. Vansittart passed this information to Vernon Kell who told the Foreign Office on 11th March that "Germany was going into Czechoslovakia in the next 48 hours". Neville Chamberlain and Lord Halifax were both unconvinced by the intelligence warnings. Halifax said he saw no evidence that the Germans were "planning mischief in any particular quarter".

On 15th March Hitler's troops occupied Prague and announced the annexation of the Czech provinces of Bohemia and Moravia. Vansittart was bitter about the rejection of his warnings. He wrote in his diary: "Nothing seems any good, it seems as if nobody will listen to or believe me." On 18th March Chamberlain finally acknowledged to the cabinet that: "No reliance could be placed on any of the assurances given by the Nazi leaders." As Christopher Andrew, the author of The Defence of the Realm: The Authorized History of MI5 (2009) has pointed out: "a conclusion which the Security Service had put formally to the cabinet secretary almost three years earlier."

In early April, 1939, Dick White visited the Foreign Office to deliver a warning from Putlitz that Italy was preparing to invade Albania. At a cabinet meeting on 5th April Lord Halifax discounted reports of an impending Italian invasion. Two days later Italy occupied Albania. Chamberlain took the invasion as a personal affront. He wrote to his sister: "It cannot be denied that Mussolini has behaved to me like a sneak and a cad."

Putlitz discovered that a agent working for the British, Folkert van Koutrik, had been turned by Abwehr and that it would only be a matter of time before he was arrested. On 15th September, 1939, Putlitz and his partner and valet, Willy Schneider, fled to London. MI5 officer, Guy Liddell, wrote that "the whole situation had rather got on his nerves and that he felt he could not go on."

After the war, Wolfgang zu Putlitz became a Communist and settled in East Germany, whose nationality he adopted in 1952. According to Chapman Pincher Putlitz had always been a Marxist and had been passing information to the Soviet Union: "From 1935 to 1939 Putlitz passed secret information both to the British and the Russians, being at heart really a Soviet agent but prepared to do anything against the Nazis." Putlitz later published his autobiography, The Putlitz Dossier (1957).

Wolfgang zu Putlitz died in Potsdam on 3rd September 1975.

Robert Vansittart said... "Well, Putlitz, I understand you are not too pleased with us. Next time it will be impossible for Chamberlain to allow himself to be bamboozled by a scrap of paper on which Hitler has scribbled a few words expressing his ardent desire for peace."

Henry Kerby, the Conservative MP for Arundel... served for many years as an official agent of M15, submitting most valuable reports and performing other functions bordering on espionage, which, being of a technical nature and still usable, must remain secret.

After the Macmillan ruling, M15 was supposed to tell the prime minister of any MPs giving intelligence assistance, but an exception was made in Kerby's case because of his unique usefulness. As he had been born in Russia and spoke the language fluently, he was occasionally used as an interpreter and so gained access to Soviet ministers and other officials. He put these contacts to good use on behalf of the intelligence authorities during his visits to the Soviet Union where, as he put it, he was given "the red carpet treatment." This was not without its dangers because, as happened with Greville Wynne, he could have been seized and put on trial, had it suited the Russians to do so.

Kerby, a large man with a bald, cannonball head and amusing, rubbery features, entered M15 service through his friendship with "Klop" Ustinov, the father of Peter Ustinov. Klop was a regular M15 agent, and he and Kerby met through joint friendship with Lord Vansittart, head of the Foreign Office.

In the early part of the Second World War, Ustinov and Kerby were involved in running an aristocratic young German called Baron Wolfgang zu Putlitz, who was in the German embassy in Holland. From 1935 to 1939 Putlitz passed secret information both to the British and the Russians, being at heart really a Soviet agent but prepared to do anything against the Nazis. Through these connections, he also became friendly with Burgess and Blunt, with whom he shared interests.

It was through Putlitz that Winston Churchill, when outside the government, obtained his accurate information about the true strength of the Luftwaffe, which he used to attack Neville Chamberlain in Parliament.

Putlitz's cover was blown early in 1940, almost certainly as a result of a deliberate leak by the Russians, trying to improve their intelligence interchange with the Abwehr during the Nazi-Soviet Pact. Klop Ustinov managed to extricate him to Britain, where he was put in the care of Anthony Blunt. He remained in Britain through the war, and as he had hailed from East Germany and was pro-Soviet, he returned there. In his interrogation by M15, Blunt recalled how he, personally, had taken him to a checkpoint on the East-West frontier and handed him over.

During Kerby's numerous visits to the Russian embassy, where he was always an honored guest, as I witnessed myself, he talent-spotted for M15 regarding Russians who might be induced to defect. He seemed to be friendly with so many Russians that there were some fears inside M15 that he might be operating as a double, but the consensus among those officers who worked with him is that he was entirely loyal, and while having to make overtures to Russians to preserve his appearances as a go-between on East-West trade, he would do anything to undermine the Soviet system.


Wolfgang entstammte dem alten märkischen Adelsgeschlecht Gans zu Putlitz in der Prignitz.

Nach dem Gymnasium studierte er in München, Berlin, Freiburg im Breisgau, Heidelberg und Bonn Rechtswissenschaften. Nach der Zeit als Referendar zuletzt als Regierungsreferendar in Stettin wandte sich zu Putlitz der Landwirtschaft zu. Er lernte auf verschiedenen Gütern und pachtete danach zunächst ein väterliches Gut. Ab 1896 war er Besitzer von Barskewitz im Kreis Saatzig.

Von 1907 bis 1918 saß er als Abgeordneter des Wahlkreises Regierungsbezirk Stettin 5 (Pyritz - Saatzig) für die Deutschkonservative Partei im deutschen Reichstag. [1] Von 1904 bis 1907 war er zudem Mitglied des Preußischen Abgeordnetenhauses für die Konservativen beziehungsweise für den Bund der Landwirte. [2]

Am 14. April 1896 hatte er in Berlin Hedwig (* 5. Mai 1872 in Karlsruhe), die Tochter des preußischen Generals der Infanterie Paul von Leszczynski, geheiratet. [3]


Hitler's Black Book - information for Wolfgang Gans Edler Herr Zu Putlitz

Walther Friedrich Schellenberg (16 January 1910 – 31 March 1952) rose through the nazi ranks to become a brigadefuhrer (SS General) by the end of the war. Schellenberg was the author of the 'Black book GB' which detailed those to be arrested on a successful nazi invasion in 1940. In November 1939 Schellenberg played a major part in the Venlo Incident, which led to the capture of two British agents, Captain Sigismund Payne-Best and Major Richard Stevens. Hitler awarded Schellenberg the Iron Cross for his actions.In 1940 he was also sent to Portugal to intercept the Duke and Duchess of Windsor and try to persuade them to work for Germany. The mission was a failure Schellenberg managed only to delay their baggage for a few hours. In March 1942, Heinz Jost was fired from his position as RSHA Chief of Amt VI, SD-Ausland (SD foreign intelligence) & in his place, Schellenberg was appointed chief of SD-Ausland by Heydrich. the overall head of the entire security apparatus of the Nazi regime. According to his later memoirs, Schellenberg had been a friend of Wilhelm Canaris, the head of the Abwehr (military intelligence). However in 1944, the sections of the Abwehr were incorporated into RSHA Amt VI SD-Ausland and therefore placed under Schellenberg's command. Schellenberg was in Denmark attempting to arrange his own surrender when the British took him into custody in June 1945 the American, British, and Russian intelligence services had all been searching for him as a valuable intelligence asset.He was a witness in the Nuremburg trials but not convicted himself and released due to ill health & died of cancer in Turin in 1952. Ernst Schambacher Born 1899 in Berlin, Died 18 May 1945 in Houska , Czechoslovakia ) There are also reports he managed to escape from Czechosolovakia and whilst on the run he committed suicide.

Great Britain was to come under 'Scandinavea' for all counter espionage investigation


History

As a result of the Wendekreuzzug in 1147, the knight Johannes Gans brought the entire Stepenitz (Elbe) river area under his rule. He and his descendants built here - like the nobles von Plotho in the south of the Prignitz - next to the bishops of Havelberg an extensive independent domain, which in addition to the terra Putlitz , over which the bishop of Havelberg exercised the suzerainty, also the terrae Perleberg , Wittenberge , Lenzen , Pritzwalk and Grabow .

In these areas the "geese" claimed sovereign rights, directed the settlement work of the locators , founded castles and the cities of Perleberg, Wittenberge and Putlitz as well as the end of their colonization work in 1231 the Cistercian nunnery Marienfließ in the far north of the Putlitz rule as a house monastery and burial place .

The goose was the only one of the Prignitz families to belong to the gentry class until the middle of the 13th century and were treated as equals to the princely and counts' classes in contracts and resolutions . Since it was awarded in 1373, the house has had the imperial hereditary marshal dignity of the Elector of Brandenburg. Parts of the family proudly rejected the - often bought and thus disavowed - elevation to the baron and count status up until recently in the Kingdom of Prussia, however, they were counted as barons until 1918. Even in the German Democratic Republic , descendants kept their old title "zu Putlitz" upright.

Today's family members are successfully trying to restore former family cultural assets, such as the baroque Wolfshagen Castle .

From the Altmark

Wende Crusade

The rise of the Gans zu Putlitz family is connected with the conquest of the Margraviate of Brandenburg by the Ascanian and first Margrave Albrecht the Bear and the subsequent development of the country .

The East Elbe Prignitz is one of the oldest areas of the Margraviate of Brandenburg, which came under the rule of the Askanian dynasty before Albrecht was founded in 1157 . In 1147 Albrecht and his sons Otto I and Hermann led an army of around 60,000 men from the neighboring Altmark in the west of the Elbe , which was part of the Ascanian homeland, through today's Prignitz in the direction of Stettin against the Lutizen , a Slav tribe based in the southeast . At the same time, Albrecht's later arch enemy Heinrich the Lion moved north with around 40,000 men against the Abodrites .

As a result of this so-called Wendenkreuzzug , according to Albrecht biographer Lutz Partenheimer, “under the sign of the cross, smaller dynasties also established themselves on the East Elbe soil of the North Mark [. ]. The realization that, in view of the many other powers that are interested in the Slavic area, he would probably not be able to maintain this in the long run alone, may have been promoted by the Slav campaign against Albrecht the Bear. "

Johannes Goose

One of the knights who used the Wendenkreuzzug to gain territory was Johannes Gans, who also came from the Altmark and founded the aristocratic Gans zu Putlitz dynasty on the Stepenitz river .

In a letter from January 2005, a descendant, Gebhard zu Putlitz, stated that the “historical provenance of the name” was: As a result of the country's expansion, “the Prignitz was taken by the Bishop of Havelberg and smaller territorial lords”. Among them was a knight Johannes, who after his property in the Altmark, the Gänseburg near Pollitz , between Wittenberge and Schnackenburg , was nicknamed "Gans" and passed it on to his descendants. In his coat of arms he led a flying silver goose on a green three-hill on a red shield. The castle of origin, the Gänseburg near Pollitz , was likely to have been a larger fortified courtyard, in which the large-scale family very likely had successful goose breeding, which, according to available evidence, had given them a certain reputation and access to "higher circles". Today there is only one large mound of earth covered with trees from the Gänseburg.

The descendants of Johannes called themselves Gans von Wittenberge , Gans von Perleberg or Gans zu Putlitz , depending on their possessions . All three cities are founded by the family, which temporarily claimed sovereign rights in parts of their areas (in the terra Putlitz under the suzerainty of the bishop of Havelberg ) and led the settlement of the areas. The family branch that still exists today is the "Gans, Noble Lords of Putlitz".

"Old Castle" of the geese in Wittenberge , today the city museum

Wall building, remnant of the "Gänseburg" in Perleberg

Tower of the "Gänseburg" in Putlitz

The geese at Perleberg

In the course of the German colonization after the conquest of the East Elbe territories, which later became the Mark Brandenburg, Perleberg was founded under the care of the Gans family and was granted the town charter on October 29, 1239. The oldest documented mention, however, comes from March 1239, when Johann Gans granted the shoemakers the privilege. After the Battle of Bornhöved (1227) , in which the Gans family supported the Danes against the Counts of Schwerin and the Brandenburg Margraves, terra Perleberg fell to the County of Schwerin. Johann Gans, the city lord of Perleberg, took the area from the counts as a fief . In 1275 the sons of Otto III. of Brandenburg the feudal lordship over Perleberg from the Counts of Schwerin. Towards the end of the 13th century, with the death of Johann Gans, the line of geese, Herren zu Perleberg, expires. Perleberg fell as a settled fiefdom to the margraves and became an immediate city .

The geese at Wittenberge

Wittenberge is mentioned in a document as Wittemberg on July 22nd, 1300, when the city lord Otto I. Gans confirmed the rights of Wittenberg as a city. The geese originally levied the Elbe toll here. The family managed to keep the Wittenberge branch until it was sold in 1781, but it did not gain the importance of the Putlitz branch.

The geese at Putlitz

Most influential was the Putlitz family branch , which is still flourishing today . The main seat of the Putlitz family branch was Putlitz Castle in what is now the city of the same name. The tower of the later medieval castle is still there. The name addition to Putlitz is borrowed from the city and does not go back to the Gänseburg Pollitz in the Altmark. Already in 946 the castle Pochlustim was mentioned in a document of the diocese of Havelberg , the name of which probably comes from Slavonic with an unclear etymology .

Chronology

Johann Gans zu Putlitz

The work of colonization of the Putlitz family branch was brought to a conclusion in 1231 by the knight Johann Gans zu Putlitz , who resided at Putlitz Castle, with the foundation of the Cistercian monastery Marienfließ in the far north of Prignitz. The founding of the monastery also had an internal German function to secure the border against the Mecklenburg and Schwerin counts.

At the beginning of the 13th century the noble goose had to give up their original territorial sovereignty over extensive areas of the Prignitz in favor of the margraves of Brandenburg, who strove to expand their sovereign power. As a result of this development and the results of the Brandenburg-Danish battles of 1214 for supremacy in the Baltic Sea area, Johann Gans got between the fronts of the great powers and sought to secure the continued existence of his rule through an alliance with Denmark. As a result of this war he lost the terrae Grabow to the Counts of Schwerin, the terrae Pritzwalk and Lenzen to Margrave Albrecht II of Brandenburg and had to subordinate the terrae Putlitz to the fiefdom of the Havelberg Church. On the other hand, he kept Perleberg and Wittenberge and was initially able to secure the independence of his position and the continued existence of his own rule despite all the losses. After the secularization of the diocese of Havelberg, the feudal lordship of terra Putlitz, which still comprised 35 villages at the end of the 15th century, passed to the elector.

At the end of the 12th century, Johann Gans zu Putlitz had become closely associated with Albrecht the Bear's grandson, Margrave Otto II (1184–1205), at whose side a bust in his honor around 1900 in Berlin's former Siegesallee Side monument was erected. Already at the beginning of the 13th century he had to give up the sovereignty of some areas in favor of the Ascanian rulers and after temporary reference to the Danish side after the battle of Bornhöved on July 27, 1227 he lost the Land Grabow to the Schwerin counts as well as the countries Pritzwalk and Lenzen to Otto's brother and successor Albrecht II. (1205–1220), but he retained the rule in the core area of ​​Putlitz, under the episcopal Havelberg fiefdom, and the Gans family was able to secure this for centuries (see Marienfließ Abbey ). In contrast to the autonomy of the so-called Immediatstädte, which developed in the 14th century, the cities of Putlitz and at that time also Wittenberge remained (directly) as media cities (indirectly) under the control, jurisdiction and external representation of those in Putlitz.

Secularization and Stein-Hardenberg Reforms

With the secularization of the diocese of Havelberg in the course of the Reformation , the suzerainty passed to the Hohenzollern , who had ruled the Mark Brandenburg as elector since 1415 . The gradual conversion to the landlord's own economy in the 16th century led to the concentration of the possessions on smaller units with the three centers Putlitz, Wolfshagen and Nettelbeck (today a district of Putlitz).

The Thirty Years War (1618–1648) raged particularly violently in Mecklenburg, Western Pomerania and in Prignitz. The already sparsely populated area was largely deserted, castles and palaces were destroyed and with them many archives, so that the sources of the goods in the Prignitz before 1600 are relatively sparse. After the turmoil and horror of the war, large parts of the region were practically resettled. By appropriating barren or desolate villages, tracts of land or even landlord's possessions, the peasant laying , many landlords were able to enlarge their areas until a law in 1709 ended this practice in Prussia . At the end of the 17th century, the Gans zu Putlitz family owned 56 settlements or parts of settlements in the Putlitz / Wolfshagen area, including 18 deserted field marks .

From 1771 to 1787 Albrecht Gottlob Gans Edler Herr zu Putlitz had Wolfshagen Castle as a late Baroque two-wing complex (the planned third wing was no longer built) on the vaults of an originally Gans moated castle , which was later expanded into a four-wing Renaissance castle was to build, which fell into disrepair after the Thirty Years War. The reforms of the rural legal relations with the reorganization of the traditional feudal burden systems through the Stein and Hardenberg reforms at the beginning of the 19th century were mastered by the Gans zu Putlitz family with renewed restructuring of the property. In the course of the transformation into estate economies , the aristocratic family was even able to establish new estates or farms (Laaske, Retzin, Hellburg, Rohlsdorf, Klein Langerwisch, Horst, Dannhof) or acquire them (Groß Langerwisch).

During the time of National Socialism and during the Second World War , the family's goods were largely preserved. There was no unified social and political orientation in the family, which had meanwhile grown widely, at that time An example of the work of the Hamburg architect and NSDAP member Erich Wilhelm Julius Freiherr Gans Edler Herr zu Putlitz (1892–1945) can be found in the appendix under “National Socialist Builder”.

GDR and German reunification

The core areas of the family, comprising seven estates, lasted until 1945. The end of the Second World War brought a turning point for all of the East Elbe property. Manor houses like Lenzen were demolished or destroyed, the goods were expropriated and divided up from autumn 1945 with the land reform, the owners were expelled. Other manor houses such as Krams bei Kyritz fell victim to the so-called Neubauer program of 1947 . Valuable art holdings and archives of the aristocratic houses were lost.

Some manor houses and noble houses survived as schools, children's homes or dormitories, but fell into disrepair due to lack of care or were defaced with unadorned extensions, the parks of the houses were almost completely neglected. The most important building of the Putlitz family, which was used as a school during the GDR era and has remained in place, is the Baroque Wolfshagen Castle , which has now been completely renovated and whose park was laid out by landscape architect Peter Joseph Lenné . In addition to the European Union , the Federal Republic , the State of Brandenburg and municipal, private and private sponsors, members of the Putlitz family also contributed to the costs of the proper restoration between 2000 and 2003 .

The Berliner Zeitung notes on the relationship between the former landowners and the population and their claims after German reunification in 1990 :

One von Ribbek, who entered "his" village with a manorial gesture of ownership, quickly learned that yesterday's patronage had no chance. On the other hand, there are impressive examples of ethos that were actively demonstrated: . the ophthalmologist Bernhard von Barsewisch from the Gans Edle zu Putlitz family in Groß Pankow and Wolfshagen . and many others came with respect for the life lived in the East. They didn't want money, but brought some with them from their secure livelihoods that they had given up in the West.

The aforementioned Bernhard von Barsewisch is a son of Elisabeth Gans Edle Herrin zu Putlitz and built an eye clinic in the Groß Pankow manor house, which the GDR had turned into a hospital. Before that he was head of an eye clinic in Munich. Barsewisch is also the initiator of the restoration and museum foundation of Wolfshagen Castle and a member of the support groups for Wolfshagen Castle and Marienfließ Monastery . He is also committed to the restoration of the estate parks in Groß Pankow and Wolfshagen, about the history and condition of which he published a book together with Torsten Foelsch in 2004.

Wolfshagen Castle with an intact park and Stepenitz, lithograph from 1857


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The Putlitz Dossier

Putlitz, Wolfgang Gans, Edler Herr Zu (1899-1975)

Published by London, Wingate, 1957

First Edition. Fine cloth copy in a good if somewhat edge-torn (with some loss) and dust-toned dw, now mylar-sleeved. Remains quite well-preserved overall tight, bright, clean and strong. 252 pages Description: 252 p. 23 cm. Inscribed by previous owner. Subjects: Diplomats --Correspondence, reminiscences, etc. 1 Kg.

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Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress

Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress.

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Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz Salary, Education, School, College, Qualifications, Favorite Things, Film, Actor, Actress


Census records can tell you a lot of little known facts about your Zu Putlitz ancestors, such as occupation. Occupation can tell you about your ancestor's social and economic status.

There are 3,000 census records available for the last name Zu Putlitz. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Zu Putlitz census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 642 immigration records available for the last name Zu Putlitz. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in Australia, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 1,000 military records available for the last name Zu Putlitz. For the veterans among your Zu Putlitz ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.

There are 3,000 census records available for the last name Zu Putlitz. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Zu Putlitz census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 642 immigration records available for the last name Zu Putlitz. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in Australia, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 1,000 military records available for the last name Zu Putlitz. For the veterans among your Zu Putlitz ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.


Life Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_section_0

Gans zu Putlitz came from a noble family in the Prignitz district of Brandenburg. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_3

He was the heir to Laaske Castle, which included extensive agricultural land. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_4

Gans zu Putlitz studied agriculture and economics in Berlin, where he received his doctorate in 1924. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_5

Gans zu Putlitz entered the diplomatic service and was first posted to the German Consulate General in Poznań, Poland. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_6

In 1928, he was transferred to the Embassy in Washington, D.C. and then, in 1934, to Paris and then London, where he was appointed First Secretary in charge of the Consular Section. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_7

Gans zu Putlitz became an agent of the British intelligence services because he did not approve of the war plans of the German National Socialists. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_8

On 1 November 1935, he joined the NSDAP, according to the records of German Foreign Service, and he was a member of the SS. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_9

When war broke out in 1939, Gans zu Putlitz was the second highest diplomat at the German embassy in the neutral Netherlands, a position from which he gave the British information on deployment plans and strength of the German troops. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_10

For the British intelligence officer Klop Ustinov (who was previously also a German diplomat), Gans zu Putlitz was one of the most important sources. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_11

It was, alleged MI5 Assistant Director Peter Wright, "priceless intelligence, possibly the most important human-source intelligence Britain received in the prewar period". Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_12

The Abwehr recruited an agent within the MI6 office in the Netherlands, Folkert van Koutrik, who supplied a list of British agents in the Netherlands. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_13

Gans zu Putlitz was shown this list and knew he had to seek asylum. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_14

In October 1939, he fled from the Netherlands to England, then to Jamaica, Haiti and the United States. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_15

Germany sentenced Gans zu Putlitz to death for high treason in absentia. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_16

From January 1944 to April 1945, he was assistant at Soldatensender Calais in England, a propaganda radio station. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_17

With the war's end in 1945, Gans zu Putlitz returned to Germany on behalf of MI6. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_18

The British occupation authorities had him appointed senior executive officer and personal assistant to the Prime Minister of Schleswig-Holstein. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_19

However, as a known confidant of the occupying power, he was not tolerated in this position on a permanent basis. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_20

Via Switzerland and Paris, he returned to Britain. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_21

In 1948, he became a British citizen. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_22

Gans zu Putlitz acted as a witness for the prosecution at the Nuremberg Trials, testifying against war criminals in the German Foreign Service. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_23

Gans zu Putlitz opposed the division of the country and the creation of the Federal Republic. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_24

Gans zu Putlitz returned to East Germany in January 1952. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_25

He worked as a freelance writer and editor for the publishing house Verlag Volk und Wissen in Bad Saarow and Berlin, which until German reunification published almost all textbooks in the DDR. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_26

He was a consultant for the East German Foreign Ministry and the , the association of former officers of the National Committee for a Free Germany (NKFD). Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_27

He was a member and political associate of the National Council of the East German National Front. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_28

Gans zu Putlitz, in his later years, was disappointed with the DDR as it became a totalitarian state. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_29

After his death in 1975, he was buried in the cemetery of Groß Kreutz at Potsdam. Wolfgang Gans zu Putlitz_sentence_30


Watch the video: Riesen auf Gleisen Ein Film aus der Lausitz 1994


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