Nestor ARB-6 - History

Nestor ARB-6 - History


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Nestor
(ARB-6: dpl. 4,100; 1. 328'; b. 50'; dr. 11'2"; s. 11 k.; cpl. 26t;; a. 1 3", 8 40mm.; cl. Aristaeus)

Nestor (ARB-6) was laid down 13 September 1943 as LST518 by Chicago Bridge and Iron Co., Seneca, Ill., launched 20 January 1944, sponsored by Miss Rita Jenkins, converted by Maryland Dry Dock Co., Baltimore, and commissioned 24 June 1944, Comdr. Frank W. Parsons, USNR, in command.

Designed to make emergency repairs in forward areas to battle-damaged ships, Nestor left Norfolk 4 August 1944 for Guantanamo Bay, the Panama Canal, and Ulithi, arriving 21 October to take up her primary mission. During the next five and a half months she acted as tender to small craft and repaired all types of naval vessels from battleships to LCI's.

Nestor left Ulithi 19 April 1945 for Kerama Retto, seized in the initial phase of the Okinawa campaign to serve as a base for the ships engaged in the main assault. Japanese air attacks, often by suicide plane, inflicted heavy damage on the fleet, and Nestor worked round the clock, often mlder fire her

self, to help keep the fighting ships in action. As Okinawa itself became secure Nestor entered Buckner Bay 10 July and continued her vital services, which here included the tremendous task of building A cofferdam. Nestor was driven aground by wind and heavy seas in the devastating typhoon of 9 October, and had to be abandoned. She decommissioned 29 November, and her hulk was sold for scrap in May 1947.


Nestor ARB-6 - History

Nestor is an international bibliography of Aegean studies, Homeric society, Indo-European linguistics, and related fields. It is published monthly from September to May (each volume covers one calendar year) by the Department of Classics at the University of Cincinnati. Nestor is not published during the months of June, July, and August, on the assumption that the staff and many of the readers will be engaged in the field work that will result in future bibliographic items to be listed in Nestor. It is currently edited by Carol Hershenson.

The primary geographic nexus of Nestor is the Aegean, including all of Greece, Albania, and Cyprus, the southern area of Bulgaria, and the western and southern areas of Turkey. Nestor includes publications concerning the central and western Mediterranean, southeastern Europe, the eastern Mediterranean, western Asia, and other regions of archaeological research, if the specific bibliographic items contain Aegean artifacts, imitations, or influences, or make reference to Aegean comparanda.

Nestor's chronological range is the prehistoric period in the regions covered, from the Paleolithic through the end of the Geometric period. As with publications concerning geographic regions outside Nestor's direct range, so with bibliography regarding chronological periods beyond these limits, Nestor includes items concerned with other periods if they discuss comparisons or questions of continuity involving the prehistoric period, or if they involve geological developments whose effects were felt in the prehistoric period. Within the topographic and chronological scope defined above Nestor attempts to list all publications on any aspect of human activity. These include, but are not limited to, human interactions with the environment material culture social, political, and economic activities, structures, and organizations and languages and systems of measurement, recording, writing, and accounting. Related topics such as Philistine culture within our chronological limits, 'Archaeolgica Homerica', the Classical Cypriot syllabary, and Indo-European linguistics especially concerning the development of Greek are also covered.

In a similar vein publications concerning scientific analysis, archaeological methodology and theory, and ethnoarchaeology are included in Nestor if they cite comparisons, data, or examples from Aegean prehistory.

The core of each monthly issue of Nestor is the bibliography of recent publications which are within the geographic and chronological scope defined above. Each year the bibliographic listings from the previous year are reformatted and up-loaded into the searchable database of Nestor, accessible at http://classics.uc.edu/nestor/. In addition, the COMMUNICATIONS section of each monthly issue of Nestor lists grants and fellowships, calls for papers, future conferences and lectures, and past conferences and lectures, and museum announcements and special exhibitions, which may be of interest to scholars conducting research within the geographic and chronological scope of Nestor.

Volumes 1-4 (1957-1977) were edited by Emmett L. Bennett, Jr., and were published by the Institute for Research in the Humanities, University of Wisconsin. Volumes 5-21 (1978-1994) were published by the Program in Classical Archaeology, Indiana University, Bloomington, and were edited by Tom Jacobsen (1978-1980, 1981-1986), Wolf Rudolph (1978-1987), Karen Vitelli (1980-1981, 1987-1991, 1992-1995) and Michaelis Fotiadis (1991-1992). Volume 22 (1995) was published at Indiana University (Jan-May) and the University of Cincinnati (Sept-Dec) Nestor moved to the Department of Classics at the University of Cincinnati in September 1995, where it is currently located (Volume 23-present). Michaelis Fotiadis (1995-1996) and Eric H. Cline (1996-2000) served as editors of NESTOR at the University of Cincinnati, and Carol R. Hershenson is the current editor.

In 2009 (Volume 36-present) issues have been available for free download as PDF files from this website since 2013 (Volume 40-present) they have been distributed only in digital PDF format. Beginning in 2014 (Volume 41-present), the bibliographic data has been available for direct download.

Assistant Editors during the period from 1978-2020 included: Natalie Abell, Eleni Androulaki, K. Mark Armstrong, Brad Ault, Jeffrey Ryan Banks, MaryBeth Banovetz, Anna Belza, Deirdre Beyer, Maura Brennan, Robert Chavez, Tracey Cullen, Dan L. Davis, Christopher De Simone, Sarah Dieterle, Ed Dietrich, Hartmut Doehl (Guest Editor), Kalliopi Efkleidou, Emily Catherine Egan, John Forg, Michaelis Fotiadis, Yuki Furuya, Constantine Gianikos, Shoki Goodarzi-Tabrizi, Evi Gorogianni, P. Tyler Haas, Fritz Hemans, Fran Huber, Julie Hruby, Olga Kalentzidou, Ada Kalogirou, Philip Kiernan, Sam Kincaid, Charlie J. Kocurek, Christina L. Kolb, Jeffrey L. Kramer (Guest Editor), Steve Krebs, Anne Kugler, Ols Lafe, Shannon LaFayette, Charlotte Lakeotes, Benjamin Leonard, Alexandra Lesk, Sarah Lima, Sean Lockwood, Erin W. Lopp, Michael Ludwig, A.J. Lyons, Benedetta Mariotti, Margaret Milhous, Melissa Moore, Joanne Murphy, Jim Newhard, Emilia Oddo, Daniel Osland, Hüseyin Çinar Öztürk, Eirini Paizi, Libby Percival, Bice Peruzzi, Dan Pullen, Mark Rose, Dimitris Sagias, David Schwei, Christine Shriner, Margaret Sneeringer, Margo Stavros, Peter J. Stone, Tom Strasser, Anna Stroulia, Charles J. Sturge, William Weir, Anna Werner, J.M. Wickens, Aaron Wolpert, Christine Wong, and Paschalis Zafeiriadis.

The original computerization of the entire Nestor database, completed at Indiana University, was made possible through receipt of a generous grant from the Institute of Aegean Prehistory. Subsequently, INSTAP made it possible to move the office of NESTOR from Indiana University to the University of Cincinnati in 1995 and continues to support it in its new home.

Complete copies of volumes 1-4 are available from University Microfilms at the following addresses:


Service history [ edit | edit source ]

Designed to make emergency repairs in forward areas to battle-damaged ships, Nestor left Norfolk 4 August 1944 for Guantanamo Bay, the Panama Canal, and Ulithi, arriving 21 October to take up her primary mission. During the next five and a half months she acted as tender to small craft and repaired all types of naval vessels from battleships to LCIs.

Nestor left Ulithi 19 April 1945 for Kerama Retto, seized in the initial phase of the Okinawa campaign to serve as a base for the ships engaged in the main assault. Japanese air attacks, often by suicide plane, inflicted heavy damage on the fleet, and Nestor worked round-the-clock, often under fire her self, to help keep the fighting ships in action. As Okinawa itself became secure, Nestor entered Buckner Bay 10 July and continued her vital services, which here included the tremendous task of building a cofferdam. Nestor was driven aground by wind and heavy seas in the devastating Typhoon "Louise" of 9 October, and had to be abandoned. She decommissioned on 29 November, was stricken on 3 January 1946, and her hulk was sold for scrap on 1 May 1947.

Nestor driven aground at Buckner Bay, Okinawa, by wind and heavy seas during Typhoon "Louise", 9 October 1945. The aftermath of the typhoon found this jumble of ships with Nestor's bow (center of photo) through the stern of the USS Ocelot. Note the YTB alongside.

In November 1945 the CNO directed that the hulk be sunk or destroyed, but this was not done and she became one of around 15 Okinawa typhoon wrecks that were finally sold for scrap in two batches in May and November 1947 by the State Department's Foreign Liquidations Commission. Nestor along with LST-823, LST-826, three floating docks, and some smaller craft, were included in the May batch and were purchased by the Oklahoma-Philippines Company in what was referred to as the "Berry sale". The date of her scrapping is not known.


Wreck of USS Twiggs (DD-591)

USS Twiggs was a Fletcher Class Destroyer laid down at the Charleston Navy Yard in April 1943 and commissioned into US Navy service in November of the same year. Assigned to the US Atlantic Fleet for shakedown and training, the Twiggs and her crew were reassigned to the Pacific Fleet as escorts for the recently commissioned USS Franklin (CV-13), arriving at Pearl Harbor on June 6th, 1944.

Engaged in training and escorting convoys between Oahu and Eniwetok through August 1944, the Twiggs stood out of Pearl on September 15th as a member of Destroyer Squadron 49, which was assigned to Task Group 79.2 and bound for the Philippine Islands. After touching at Manaus to combine forces with the balance of the US Naval armada, the Twiggs arrived off Leyte on October 20th with the entire US Philippine Invasion Force and screened the ships of Transport Attack Group "Baker" as they landed US forces on the Japanese-held islands. Remaining on station and repelling several waves of Japanese air attack in the days that followed, the Twiggs withdrew with the ships of Baker Group to Manaus on October 25th and began convoy escort and radar picket duty off the Palau Islands through December.

Rejoining the fight on December 10th, the Twiggs joined the Allied Task Force bound for the Island of Mindoro and screened their passage through the Surigao Strait then provided anti-aircraft and fire support as US troops went ashore. Alternating between a convoy escort and a fire support ship through the month of December and into January 1945 as US forces invaded Luzon Island, the Twiggs retired from Filipino waters in late January to Ulithi atoll for a brief period of upkeep and crew liberty before she was again at sea, this time bound for the tiny island of Iwo Jima. Twiggs and her crew arrived off the imposing Mt. Surabachi on February 16th and remained on station providing fire support as the Battle of Iwo Jima raged ashore until March 10th, when she again retired to Ulithi for repairs, upkeep and much needed R&R for her crew.

Once again ready for action by late March, the Twiggs stood out of Ulithi on March 25th bound for Okinawa, arriving once more in the vanguard force and providing pre-invasion bombardment of Japanese positions onshore, which she continued for several weeks after the initial landings took place on April 1st. Gradually withdrawn to Radar Picket Duty as part of a US attempt to provide early warning against the massive number of Japanese Kamikaze aircraft being hurled against the American Fleet, the Twiggs and her crew fought off numerous attacks successfully, but a near-miss from a downed Japanese bomber on April 28th damaged her propeller and hull badly enough to warrant her withdrawal back to Kerama Retto anchorage, where she was under repair alongside the USS Nestor (ARB-6) until May 17th.

Twiggs returned to her fire support and radar picket duty and continued her work in support of US forces through the end of May and into June when it finally seemed that the nightmarish Battle of Okinawa was nearing an end. Assigned to Picket Station 11 in the Western Fire Support Area as mop-up operations continued onshore, the Twiggs and her crew assumed their station on June 14th. Two days later as the sun was setting, reports began flashing of Japanese aircraft inside the outer picket ring, sending Twigg's crew to General Quarters. Brightly lit by the sun, the Destroyer made a perfect target for the pilot of a D4Y "Judy" torpedo bomber, who dropped out of the low cloud deck and approached the Twiggs from the West, using the bright sunlight to shield his approach. Sighted by gunners when only a mere 1000 yards away, the Twiggs crew opened fire on their attacker but were too late to stop the Japanese pilot from releasing his torpedo and zooming back into the cloud cover. With such limited warning that the ship was under attack, the Twiggs was unable to make much headway before the torpedo slammed into her Stern on her Port side beneath her rear 5-inch mounts, causing her entire after magazine to detonate at 2030hrs. Seconds later the Japanese plane reappeared from the clouds in his suicide dive, and drove his fuel-laden aircraft into the Twigg's forward gun mounts, causing heavy damage and covering the bow in flames.

Those stationed below decks that survived the aft magazine detonation were quickly forced from their posts by intense heat and flames, and damage control teams were powerless to fight the raging inferno consuming much of their ships after spaces. Topside crews fared little better as raging gasoline fires poured into holes punched by the Kamikaze in Twigg's deck, spreading fires in her fore spaces as well and rendering firefighting efforts all but useless. As other ships closed on the burning Destroyer to render assistance the Twigg was rocked by a second massive detonation, this time from her forward 5-inch magazines, which blew out large portions of her hill and showered the area in shrapnel and exploding ammunition. Needing no further confirmation to abandon ship, Twigg's surviving crew took to the water where they were hastily pulled out before further ammunition detonations made the area around the ship too dangerous for rescue attempts. Remaining afloat for less than an hour after the kamikaze attack, the Twigg's burning hulk finally flooded and sank at this location shortly after 2115hrs on June 16th, 1945, taking 152 of her crew, including her Captain, with her to the bottom. A further 41 of her men died of their injuries after rescue.

For her actions in the Second World War, USS Twigg received four Battle Stars. Her wreck was formally donated to the Government of Okinawa in 1957 and is designated a War Grave.


Service history

Designed to make emergency repairs in forward areas to battle-damaged ships, Nestor left Norfolk 4 August 1944 for Guantanamo Bay, the Panama Canal, and Ulithi, arriving 21 October to take up her primary mission. During the next five and a half months she acted as tender to small craft and repaired all types of naval vessels from battleships to LCIs.

Nestor left Ulithi 19 April 1945 for Kerama Retto, seized in the initial phase of the Okinawa campaign to serve as a base for the ships engaged in the main assault. Japanese air attacks, often by suicide plane, inflicted heavy damage on the fleet, and Nestor worked round-the-clock, often under fire her self, to help keep the fighting ships in action. As Okinawa itself became secure, Nestor entered Buckner Bay 10 July and continued her vital services, which here included the tremendous task of building a cofferdam. Nestor was driven aground by wind and heavy seas in the devastating Typhoon "Louise" of 9 October, and had to be abandoned. She decommissioned on 29 November, was stricken on 3 January 1946, and her hulk was sold for scrap on 1 May 1947.

In November, 1945 the CNO directed that the hulk be sunk or destroyed, but this was not done and she became one of around 15 Okinawa typhoon wrecks that were finally sold for scrap in two batches in May and November, 1947 by the State Department's Foreign Liquidations Commission. Nestor along with LST-823, LST-826, three floating docks, and some smaller craft, were included in the May batch and were purchased by the Oklahoma-Philippines Company in what was referred to as the "Berry sale". The date of her scrapping is not known.


Contents

In June 1945, American forces secured Okinawa. Nakagusuku Bay became an important U.S. anchorage. U. S. Army troops referred to it as "Buckner Bay", in memory of Lieutenant General Simon Bolivar Buckner, Jr., commander of U.S. land forces in the campaign, who was killed on 18 June.

Naval Base Buckner Bay was set up in the bay. It consisted of the anchorage, repair and depot ships, and various onshore facilities. The Base provided support to USN ships operating off Japan, and was also used to land supplies for forces on Okinawa. It was attacked several times during the remaining weeks of the war USS Pennsylvania was torpedoed there by a Japanese aircraft. The base continued operations into the immediate postwar period.

In October 1945, Typhoon Louise struck Buckner Bay, inflicting heavy damage. Fifteen merchant ships were driven ashore, some damaged beyond recovery. Three USN destroyers were also wrecked. Over 200 other US military vessels, including six LCTs, various special purpose boats, patrol boats, and landing craft were grounded, severely damaged, or destroyed altogether. Eighty percent of the buildings in the bay were completely wiped out while over 60 aircraft then present at local airstrips were damaged.


Florida Rep. Matt Gaetz Tells the Story of the Teen He's Been Raising Whom He Calls His 'Son'

The two-term Republican congressman surprised many with his Thursday announcement that he&rsquos a parent, though he hasn&rsquot adopted 19-year-old Nestor: &ldquoOur family&rsquos defined by love&rdquo

Six years ago, Florida Rep. Matt Gaetz says, he met the young boy he now calls his son.

Nestor Galban was 12 and had just arrived from Cuba, where he𠆝 grown up and where his mother had recently died of breast cancer, Gaetz says. Then a state legislator, Gaetz was dating Nestor’s older sister.

And so Nestor moved in with them — 𠇊 modern family,” Gaetz says now.

He says that, except for an interruption during Nestor’s junior year after Gaetz and Nestor’s sister broke up, Nestor has basically lived with him since moving from Cuba.

“He is a part of my family story,” Gaetz, 38, tells PEOPLE, adding: “My work with Nestor, our family, no element of my public service could compare to the joy that our family has brought me.”

Geatz did not formally adopt Nestor (and he declines to discuss Nestor’s relationship with his biological family now). He re-frames the matter, saying, “Our relationship as a family is defined by our love for each other, not by any paperwork.”

Nestor, he says, “is my son in every conceivable way, and I can’t imagine loving him any more if he was my own flesh and blood.” Recalling those early days with Nestor — including a scene he paints of the two playing catch not long after the boy arrived to the U.S. — Gaetz warns that he might start to choke up.

“I just think that it’s been the greatest thing in my life that this young man has been a part of my family,” he says, 𠇊nd going forward I look forward to being his biggest cheerleader.”

Perhaps the strangest thing about this story is that this is the first time any of it has been shared publicly.

On Thursday, Gaetz tweeted a photo of himself and Nestor, announcing that he𠆝 been parenting the 19-year-old for years.

"I am so proud of him and raising him has been the best, most rewarding thing I’ve done in my life," he wrote before biting back at a Democratic congressman he had argued with at a hearing the day before over policing and raising kids of color.

𠇊s you can imagine, I was triggered when (to make an absurd debate point) a fellow congressman diminished the contributions of Republicans because we don’t raise non-white kids,” he wrote. “Well, I have."

The second-term Republican congressman from Florida&aposs Panhandle had not publicly identified himself as a father before this week and his office has said that he did not have kids.

His announcement drew widespread surprise and, in many left-leaning circles, much criticism. (It was also rapidly meme&aposd.)

Detractors said Gaetz had turned the teenager into a prop others called it a dismissive sleight-of-hand — like shrugging off accusations of prejudice by pointing to personal friendships with people of color. Many pointed to his views on immigration more broadly. In a characteristic slam, one user tweeted: “Matt Gaetz using Nestor to score political points or to show he is not racist is disgusting.”

In other corners of social media, conspiratorial theories began tangling together about Nestor’s biography and his biological relatives.

“I haven’t responded to it there and feel no need to respond to it now,” he says of the social media discussion about Nestor. “My son and I owe no explanation about our family to the blue-checkmark brigade.”

“I don’t really live in the minds of others,” says the lawmaker who earlier this year made headlines for wearing a gas mask on the floor of the House of Representatives, in the early days of the novel coronavirus pandemic. “I live for the values and principles that matter to my constituents and that I’ve been raised with.”

He says he was motivated to speak out about Nestor because, in his view, he was being unfairly maligned after his viral argument with Democratic Rep. Cedric Richmond at a House Judiciary Committee hearing on Wednesday.

Richmond had been discussing the need for police reform and the "imminent threat" of police to black men. “People are dying as we talk. I am not interested in moving at a snail&aposs pace. I’m not interested in a watered-down bill that mandates nothing,” he said.

Afterward, Gaetz said that he "appreciate[d] your passion" but then asked Richmond if he was saying none of the other representatives had non-white kids. (Richmond had referred to his own son.)

Richmond snapped back that he wouldn&apost be "sidetracked about the color of our children . It is about black males, black people in the streets that are getting killed. And if one of them happens to be your kid, I&aposm concerned about him, too. And clearly I&aposm more concerned about him than you are."

"Excuse me, you&aposre claiming you&aposre more concerned for my family than I do?" Gaetz replied, voice rising to a yell. "Who in the hell do you think you are?"

Richmond later shot back: "Was that a nerve?"

The exchange, Gaetz says now, “made me want to get up and rip his head off.”

For years, Gaetz says he maintained Nestor’s privacy. But that, he insists, “is very different than suggesting I was hiding him.”

“Just imagine: You’re 12 years old, your mom has just died, you’re learning English as you’re trying to get your footing in school. It just wasn’t the right time in middle school and high school to subject him to politics,” Gaetz says now.

Of the incredulous responses he’s received from users who point back to a March 2016 photo in which Gaetz refers to Nestor as a “local student” or a 2017 Facebook video Gaetz recorded for constituents with Nestor sitting in the background in which he calls Nestor his “helper” (seeming almost to catch himself on an S-sounding word first), Gaetz says:

“I felt like coming to the country, dealing with the death of a mother, learning English and enduring the normal trials and tribulations of high school and middle school were enough on the young man’s plate.”

Now, however, Gaetz says that Nestor is ready: “He’s very eager to be identified as my son as publicly as people will accept it.”

Gaetz says his bond with Nestor has been known in his Florida community and among his social circle, including on Capitol Hill: “My friends know I have a son. The people who go to church with me know I have a son, my fellow soccer parents know I have a son.” (He says Nestor was his �st door-knocker” during his 2016 congressional campaign: “Nestor was very persuasive at getting people to accept Matt Gaetz yard signs.”)

On Twitter, former California Rep. Katie Hill, a Democrat, spoke out in defense of Gaetz’s revelation that he’s been secretly parenting a teenager.

"Many of you know @mattgaetz & I have an unlikely friendship. I can’t stand a lot of his beliefs but he’s been there for me when others haven’t," she wrote. "He talks about Nestor more than anything, has done so much for his son & is truly a proud dad."

Detailing the timeline, Gaetz tells PEOPLE Nestor lived with him for around four years after first arriving in Cuba before going to Miami for his junior year and living with his biological father: “Then he turned 18 [and] it was easier for him to just move back with me.” (Gaetz declines to specify when exactly he and Nestor&aposs older sister broke up.)

Elsewhere in the interview, he describes the sequence of events this way: “There was a time period at the beginning of my service in Congress where, based on his age and other circumstances, it was not tenable for him to live with me."

With his own Twitter account, Nestor has been wading into the reaction online. He tweeted back at another user on Thursday: "I wanted as a secret before because I wanted to have a normal life without any of y𠆚ll getting in it. But now I’m 19 and I old enough to handle it."

Briefly speaking with PEOPLE while on the phone with Gaetz, Nestor says: “Matt is not my biological father, but he raised me as his own son when I came from Cuba after my mother’s death.”

“He’s always been a role model in my life,” Nestor says, rattling off a quick list of lessons learned: baseball, cooking, English. (“I taught him some Spanish, too.”)

Nestor, Gaetz says, has taught him patience — the kind any parent learns.

"Of course," he also says, "my views on race are informed by the fact that I have been raising a non-white child."

"I’ve had ‘the talk’ with Nestor about how to interact with law enforcement," he says. "It’s probably a different talk than I would have had if I had a white son."


History

Following a shakedown cruise to Bermuda in December 1943, Twiggs operated out of Norfolk as a training ship until 12 May 1944, when she departed Hampton Roads in company with Franklin (CV-13), Cushing (DD-797), and Richard P. Leary (DD-664) and proceeded, via the Panama Canal and San Diego, to Hawaii.

After arriving in Pearl Harbor on 6 June 1944, Twiggs took part in exercises and drills in Hawaiian waters and escorted convoys operating between Oahu and Eniwetok. Throughout most of July, Twiggs worked out of Eniwetok alternating exercises with escort and radar picket duties. On 19 August, she returned to Pearl Harbor to begin rehearsals for the long-awaited return to the Philippines.

On 15 September, in preparation for the assault on Leyte, Twiggs departed Pearl Harbor as a member of Destroyer Squadron 49 (DesRon 49), screening Task Group 79.2 (TG㻏.2), Transport Attack Group "Baker", which steamed via Eniwetok for Manus in the Admiralty Islands. After final preparations for the impending invasion, she departed Seeadler Harbor on 14 October. Arriving off Leyte on 20 October, Twiggs helped to provide antiaircraft protection for the transports during the landings. In the following days of heavy enemy air activity, she continued to support the invasion and, on one occasion, rescued a downed flier from Petrof Bay (CVE-80). Twiggs departed Leyte on 25 October, steamed via Mios Woendi Island to Manus, and arrived at Seeadler Harbor on 1 November.

Twiggs next rendezvoused with Haraden (DD-585) and Halligan (DD-584) for escort duty among the Palau Islands. Stationed east of Mindanao, she protected convoys on the approaches to Leyte.

On 10 December, Twiggs left Kossol Roads, between Peleliu and Angaur, with a task force bound for the occupation of Mindoro Island. Luzon was the key to the liberation of the Philippines, and Mindoro was the first step in the assault on Luzon. From 13 December through the 17th, Twiggs provided antiaircraft cover for the force as it steamed through Surigao Strait and the Mindoro Sea.

Late in 1944, Japan began organized and concerted use of kamikazes. On 13 December, a Japanese suicide plane crashed into Haraden (DD-585). Twiggs aided the severely damaged destroyer, fighting fires and treating casualties. She was then detached from the convoy to guide Haraden, which had lost communications and radar in the engagement, until the battered vessel made visual contact with a tow convoy off Silino Island. Twiggs then returned to the Mindanao Sea and resumed her duties with the task unit. Army Air Force flights out of Leyte augmented escort protection of the convoy. Twiggs retired to the Palaus on 20 December.

Twiggs sortied from Kossol Roads on 1 January 1945 protecting a large task force intended for the invasion of Luzon. In the Sulu and South China Seas, several ships of the convoy were hit by Japanese plane attacks and, on 4 January 1945, Twiggs rescued 211 survivors of Ommaney Bay (CVE-79), destroyed by fire and explosion following an attack by a suicide plane. Raids by both torpedo and kamikaze planes continued as Twiggs operated northwest of Cape Bolinao in support of the Lingayen assault. After taking on food and ammunition at Mindoro, Twiggs briefly ran antisubmarine patrol off the entrance of Manganin Bay. Underway on the 21st, she arrived in Ulithi on 25 January for minor repairs and maintenance in preparation for the conquest of the Volcano Islands.

Twiggs joined Task Force 54 which sortied from Ulithi on 10 February for rehearsals at Loesip Island. On 16 February, the force arrived off Iwo Jima where Twiggs quickly began fire support for pre-assault underwater demolition operations off the eastern beaches. She also conducted screening and harassing activities, firing on Japanese shore units and providing illumination. On the 17th, a suicide plane attack on Twiggs resulted in a close call when the plane, in an obvious attempt to crash into the destroyer, crossed her fantail before hitting the water off her port beam and sinking without exploding. The destroyer continued activities to support American ground forces during the grueling battle for Iwo Jima. On 10 March, she retired toward the Carolines, arriving at Ulithi two days later for rest and replenishment.

On 25 March 1945, Twiggs arrived off Okinawa to take part in the preinvasion bombardment. In addition to antisubmarine and antiaircraft patrols, she supported ground forces with night harassing fire. Suicide planes were very active at this time, as the Japanese desperately defended the island. On 28 April, a day of heavy air activity, a kamikaze splashed close aboard Twiggs while she was on radar picket duty with Task Group 51. Bomb blast and fragmentation from the splashed airplane and bomb blew in the hull plating between the main and first platform deck causing structural damage. The underwater body was dished in, and the starboard propeller was bent. Nestor (ARB-6) repaired the damage and, on 17 May, Twiggs returned to duty with the gunfire and covering forces off Okinawa.

In June, the battle for Okinawa was drawing to its close. Twiggs continued radar picket duties in the western fire support area and supported strikes on Iheya Shima and Iheya-Aguni with pre-landing bombardment and gunfire support. On 16 June, Twiggs was on radar picket duty off Senaga Shima in the western fire support area. At 20:30, a single, low-flying plane dropped a torpedo which hit Twiggs on her port side, exploding her number 2 magazine. The plane then circled and completed its kamikaze mission in a suicide crash. The explosion enveloped the destroyer in flame and, within an hour, she sank. Despite the hazard of exploding ammunition from the blazing Twiggs, 188 survivors were rescued from the oily waters. Among the 152 dead and missing was her commanding officer, Comdr. George Philip Jr. USS Putnam (DD-757) was nearby at the time of the attack. Captain Glenn R. Hartwig, the squadron commander in Putnam, quickly closed with Twiggs. Exploding ammunition made rescue operations hazardous, but of 188 Twiggs survivors snatched from the sea, Putnam accounted for 114. [2]

Twiggs was struck from the Navy list on 11 July 1945 and, in 1957, her hulk was donated to the government of the Ryukyu Islands.


Guestbook 2012

Recently we purchased a WW2 seaman’s photo with a aluminum trench art type frame depicting he served aboard USS SC-731 and the name “Jack” inscribed across the bottom. Not much to go on but are trying to reconnect with family/shipmates or interested parties to share this wonderful photo and or information, email me and I’ll send copy of photo.

Respectfully, John Lane (Airpower Unlimited, LLC) 208-324-3650

Last week America lost another WW2 veteran, and more importantly I lost a Great Dad.

It is an honor to be the son of a man that served our country so valiantly.

Dad was drafted by the navy in 1944 out of his high school senior year, and served his country on the Sub-Chaser SC1050 in the Pacific until the end of the war.

It humbles me every time I’ve had the opportunity of meeting a WW2 veteran. Sadly the greatest generation is rapidly shrinking.

I will miss my Father, but he left me with so many great memories.

I took a trip between SF and Half Moon Bay on a yacht conversion of one of these subchasers in the 1960s. It was named Nevada Lady and at the time was home ported in the SF Bay area. It looked very original Navy at the deck level, most of the superstructure and all of the wheelhouse looked original. I was a kid at the time and my memory may be incorrect but I recall seeing two huge RADIAL diesel engines in the engine room that ran through right angle drives to the prop shafts. I remember that the had variable pitch props too and that the engines ran at constant speed. It was owned by a man who held interests in radio broadcast stations.

This Googled info might be about the boat I sailed on, age and length look about right, but I am not certain:

Summary of Motor Yacht NEVADA LADY

The Shipyard Work & Design relating to Luxury Yacht NEVADA LADY
In 1943 she was actually launched to celebration in Wilmington Ca and post sea trials and detailing was then passed on to the owner who commissioned her. Blue Trend Yachts completed their new build motor yacht in the United States. Her main hull was crafted from wooden. The motor yacht main superstructure is made extensively with wood. With a beam of 5.46 m or 17.9 feet NEVADA LADY has reasonable interior.


The Performance And Engine Room On M/Y NEVADA LADY:
For propulsion NEVADA LADY has twin screw propellers. Her total HP is 2400 HP and her total Kilowatts are 1766.


The Guest Accommodation Provided by Superyacht NEVADA LADY:


A List of the Specifications of the NEVADA LADY:
Superyacht Name: Motor Yacht NEVADA LADY Ex: - Built By: Blue-Trend - Built in: Wilmington Ca, United States - Launched in: 1943 - Refitted in: - Length Overall: 32.67 metres / 107.2 feet - Waterline Length:

Naval Architecture: , - Designers Involved in Yacht Design: - Interior Designers: - Gross Tonnes: 128 - Nett Tonnes: 43 - Displacement: - Hull / Superstructure Construction Material: wooden / wood - Owner of NEVADA LADY: - Cost To Build: - NEVADA LADY available for luxury yacht charters: - Is the yacht for sale: - Helicopter Landing Pad: No - Swimming Pool: - Jacuzzi Spa: - Material Used For Deck: wood

The Country the Yacht is Flagged in: United States - The official registry port is Los Angeles Ca and her home port is San Diego Ca, USA - Class society used: - Completed survey under Maritime & Coastguard Agency (MCA) Large Yacht Code: - Max yacht charter guests - Guest’s cabins: - Guests Cabin configuration: - Maximum Number of Guests Whilst Underway: - Number of Crew Members:
- Total engine power output 2400 HP /1766 KW. - Potable water capacity: unknown. - Beam: 5.46m/17.9ft.


Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

The second Twiggs (DD-591) was laid down on 20 January 1943 at Charleston, S.C., by the Charleston Navy Yard launched on 7 April 1943 sponsored by Mrs. Roland S. Morris and commissioned on 4 November 1943, Comdr. John B. Fellows, Jr., in command.

Following a shakedown cruise to Bermuda in December 1943, Twiggs operated out of Norfolk as a training ship until 12 May 1944, when she departed Hampton Roads in company with Franklin (CV-13), Cushing (DD-797), and Richard P. Lear (DD 664) and proceeded, via the Panama Canal and San Diego, to Hawaii.

After arriving in Pearl Harbor on 6 June 1944, Twiggs took part in exercises and drills in Hawaiian waters and escorted convoys operating between Oahu and Eniwetok. Throughout most of July, Twiggs worked out of Eniwetok alternating exercises with escort and radar picket duties. On 19 August, she returned to Pearl Harbor to begin rehearsals for the long-awaited return to the Philippines.

On 15 September, in preparation for the assault on Leyte, Twiggs departed Pearl Harbor as a member of Destroyer Squadron 49, screening Task Group 79.2 Transport Attack Group "Baker," which steamed via Eniwetok for Manus in the Admiralty Islands. After final preparations for the impending invasion, she departed Seeadler Harbor on 14 October. Arriving off Leyte on 20 October, Twiggs helped to provide antiaircraft protection for the transports during the landings. In the following days of heavy enemy air activity, she continued to support the invasion and, on one occasion rescued a downed flier from Petrof Bay (CVE-80). Twiggs departed Leyte on 25 October, steamed via Mios Woendi Island to Manus, and arrived at Seeadler Harbor on 1 November.

Twiggs next rendezvoused with Haraden (DD-585) and Halligan (DD-584) for escort duty among the Palau Islands. Stationed east of Mindanao, she protected convoys on the approaches to Leyte.

On 10 December, Twiggs left Kossol Roads, between Peleliu and Angaur, with a task force bound for the occupation of Mindoro Island. Luzon was the key to the liberation of the Philippines, and Mindoro was the first step in the assault on Luzon. From December 13 through the 17th, Twiggs provided antiaircraft cover for the force as it steamed through Surigao Strait and the Mindoro Sea.

Late in 1944, Japan began organized and concerted use of kamikazes. On 13 December, a Japanese suicide plane crashed into Haraden (DD-685). Twiggs aided the severely damaged destroyer, fighting fires and treating casualties. She was then detached from the convoy to guide Haraden, which had lost communications and radar in the engagement, until the battered vessel made visual contact with a tow convoy off Silino Island. Twiggs then returned to the Mindanao Sea and resumed her duties with the task unit. Army Air Force flights out of Leyte augmented escort protection of the convoy. Twiggs retired to the Palaus on 20 December.

Twiggs sortied from Kossol Roads on 1 January 1944 protecting a large task force intended for the invasion of Luzon. In the Sulu and South China Seas, several ships of the convoy were hit by Japanese plane attacks and, on 4 January 1945, Twiggs rescued 211 survivors of Ommaney Bay (CVE-79), destroyed by fire and explosion following an attack by a suicide plane. Raids by both torpedo and kamikaze planes continued as Twiggs operated northwest of Cape Bolinao in support of the Lingayen assault. After taking on food and ammunition at Mindoro, Twiggs briefly ran antisubmarine patrol off the entrance of Manganin Bay. Underway on the 21st, she arrived in Ulithi on 26 January for minor repairs and maintenance in preparation for the conquest of the Volcanos.

Twiggs joined Task Force 64 which sortied from Ulithi on 10 February for rehearsals at Loesip Island. On 16 February, the force arrived off Iwo Jima where Twiggs quickly began fire support for pre-assault underwater demolition operations off the eastern beaches. She also conducted screening and harassing activities firing on Japanese shore units and providing illumination. On the 17th, a suicide plane attack on Twiggs resulted in a close call when the plane, in an obvious attempt to crash into the destroyer, crossed her fantail before hitting the water off her port beam and sinking without exploding. The destroyer continued activities to support American ground forces during the grueling battle for Iwo Jima. On 10 March, she retired toward the Carolines, arriving at Ulithi two days later for rest and replenishment.

On 26 March 1945, Twiggs arrived off Okinawa to take part in the preinvasion bombardment. In addition to antisubmarine and antiaircraft patrols, she supported ground forces with night harassing fire. Suicide planes were very active at this time, as the Japanese desperately defended the island. On 28 April, a day of heavy air activity, a kamikaze splashed close aboard Twiggs while she was on radar picket duty with Task Group 61. Bomb blast and fragmentation from the splashed airplane and bomb blew in the hull plating between the main and first platform deck causing structural damage. The underwater body was dished in, and the starboard propeller was bent. Nestor (ARB-6) repaired the damage and, on 17 May, Twiggs returned to duty with the gunfire and covering forces off Okinawa.

In June, the battle for Okinawa was drawing to its close. Twiggs continued radar picket duties in the western fire support area and supported strikes on Iheya Shima and Iheya-Aguni with pre-landing bombardment and gunfire support. On 16 June, Twiggs was on radar picket duty off Senaga Shima in the western fire support area At 2030, a single, low-flying plane dropped a torpedo which hit Twiggs on her port side, exploding her number 2 magazine. The plane then circled and completed its kamikaze mission in a suicide crash. The explosion enveloped the destroyer in flame and, within an hour, she sank. Despite the hazard of exploding ammunition from the blazing Twiggs, 188 survivors were rescued from the oily waters. Among the 162 dead and missing was her commanding officer, Comdr. George Phillip.

Twiggs was struck from the Navy list on 11 July 1945 and, in 1967, her hulk was donated to the government of the Ryukyu Islands.

Twiggs received four battle stars for World War II service. Transcribed and formatted for HTML by Patrick Clancey


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